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I created a big multidimensional array M with np.zeros((1000,1000)). After certain number of operations, I don't need it anymore. How can I free a RAM dynamically during program's execution? Does M=0 do it for me?

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M=0 will remove the reference, as will del M, and if that was the only reference, it should be freed immediately. –  Aya Apr 30 '13 at 12:09
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del M is also better IMHO, since M no longer pollutes the namespace your'e in. –  StoryTeller Apr 30 '13 at 12:10
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@freude you might get away with M=0 on CPython but on Jython / IronPython which don't use reference counting, you'll have to wait for their garbage collector. Even with CPython you may still have references to M in other variables and they will mean M doesn't actually get deleted. Use del M –  jamylak Apr 30 '13 at 12:12
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Also, bear in mind that to avoid fragmentation and performance costs, blocks of memory may be reserved even after being "freed". –  StoryTeller Apr 30 '13 at 12:12
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Even when the memory is reclaimed, Python isn't necessarily returning the memory to the OS, i.e., the process's memory allocation won't decrease. The memory may be reused later by the process, instead of it needing to request more from the OS. –  chepner Apr 30 '13 at 12:13
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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In general you can't. Even if you remove all the references to an object, it is left to the python implementation to re-use or free the memory. On CPython you could call gc.collect() to force a garbage collection run. But while that may reclaim memory, it doesn't necessarily return it to the OS.

But: numpy is an extension module that does its own thing, and manages its own memory.

When I monitor the memory usage of a python process, I see the RAM usage (Resident Set Size) going down after del(M)

In [1]: import numpy as np

In [2]: M = np.zeros((1000,1000))

In [3]: del(M)

In [4]: 

Just after starting IPython:

slackbox:~> ps -u 77778
USER     PID %CPU %MEM    VSZ   RSS TT  STAT STARTED    TIME COMMAND
rsmith 77778  0.0  0.5 119644 22692  0  S+    2:37PM 0:00.39 /usr/local/bin/py

After importing numpy (1):

slackbox:~> ps -u 77778
USER     PID %CPU %MEM    VSZ   RSS TT  STAT STARTED    TIME COMMAND
rsmith 77778  1.0  0.8 168548 32420  0  S+    2:37PM 0:00.49 /usr/local/bin/py

After creating the array (2):

slackbox:~> ps -u 77778
USER     PID %CPU %MEM    VSZ   RSS TT  STAT STARTED    TIME COMMAND
rsmith 77778  0.0  1.0 176740 40328  0  S+    2:37PM 0:00.50 /usr/local/bin/py

After the call to del (3):

slackbox:~> ps -u 77778
USER     PID %CPU %MEM    VSZ   RSS TT  STAT STARTED    TIME COMMAND
rsmith 77778  0.0  0.8 168548 32496  0  S+    2:37PM 0:00.50 /usr/local/bin/py
slackbox:~> 

So in this case using del() can reduce the amount of RAM used.

Note that there is an exception to this with numpy. Numpy can use memory allocated by another extension library. In that case the numpy object is marked that numpy doesn't own the memory, and freeing it is left to the other library.

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Thank you for the answer –  freude Apr 30 '13 at 14:33
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Use the del statement:

del M

And by the way, a float64 array of shape (1000, 1000) takes only 7 Mb. If you're having memory problems, it's likely that the problem is elsewhere.

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Two ways are there.......

1). del M

     But it will delete the array object it self.

2). M.clear()

     you can clear the array without deleting M object
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The second way is just exactly what I am seeking. Thank you –  freude Apr 30 '13 at 12:26
    
And since when is there such a thing as a clear method? –  seberg Apr 30 '13 at 12:26
    
No, clear() does not exist with numpy array –  freude Apr 30 '13 at 12:32
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