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I'm having issues trying to convert a table from MyISAM to InnoDB in MySQL 5.6.

The following is the table dump:

--
-- Table structure for table `companies`
--

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `companies`;
/*!40101 SET @saved_cs_client     = @@character_set_client */;
/*!40101 SET character_set_client = utf8 */;
CREATE TABLE `companies` (
  `uid` int(20) NOT NULL,
  `cid` int(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `cname` varchar(500) NOT NULL,
  `rfc` varchar(20) NOT NULL,
  `address` varchar(1000) NOT NULL,
  `dbUseExternal` tinyint(1) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `dbHost` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `dbPort` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `dbUser` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `dbPass` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `dbSSL` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `dbDriver` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `dbName` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `status` int(10) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`uid`,`cid`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;
/*!40101 SET character_set_client = @saved_cs_client */;

It works as MyISAM. But, if I try to convert it to InnoDB (or if I try editing this dump to insert it on the command line as a sql file), I get the following error:

Incorrect table definition; there can be only one auto column and it must be defined as a key

I understand that error - or at least I thought I did. I'm not really using more than one AUTO_INCREMENT column and it is defined as primary key.

Also, the information I've found regarding the error is always because of an obvious missing key or a duplicate AUTO_INCREMENT definition. One more thing I see generally commented is that the same is true for MyISAM and InnoDB.

So, why does it work for MyISAM and not for InnoDB?

Thanks in advance for any comments.

Francisco

share|improve this question
    
Why do you want a PK of (uid,cid), rather than just a pure synthetic auto_increment PK of (cid) alone? –  eggyal Apr 30 '13 at 12:14
    
It is working nicely on MyISAM to auto_increment from 1 for each client. If I add a new uid, it automatically gets cid = 1, and it increments one by one for that uid. I have Users that register Companies. So, each record is uid-cid unique. –  Francisco Zarabozo Apr 30 '13 at 12:26
    
Perhaps this answer will help? –  eggyal Apr 30 '13 at 12:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

in InnoDB, auto_increment keys have to have to: either have their own index, or at least be the primary sub-index of a compound index. (a in KEY(a,b)).

Fix this by adding a KEY(cid) after your PRIMARY KEY, like so:

CREATE TABLE `companies2` (
  `uid` int(20) NOT NULL,
  `cid` int(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `cname` varchar(500) NOT NULL,
  `rfc` varchar(20) NOT NULL,
  `address` varchar(1000) NOT NULL,
  `dbUseExternal` tinyint(1) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `dbHost` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `dbPort` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `dbUser` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `dbPass` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `dbSSL` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `dbDriver` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `dbName` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `status` int(10) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`uid`,`cid`),
  KEY(`cid`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;
share|improve this answer
    
However, you will lose this (from your comment): "It is working nicely on MyISAM to auto_increment from 1 for each client. If I add a new uid, it automatically gets cid = 1, and it increments one by one for that uid. I have Users that register Companies. So, each record is uid-cid unique." –  Tasos Bitsios Apr 30 '13 at 12:40
    
I was starting to get excited until I saw your comment. Thanks anyway for the answer, it's a good answer. :-) –  Francisco Zarabozo Apr 30 '13 at 13:22
    
If you absolutely have to do it, you can still accomplish it with custom triggers. The answer linked-to in your question's comments by eggyal describes a very similar thing. But it doesn't sound like it is worth the hassle. Up to you :) –  Tasos Bitsios Apr 30 '13 at 13:26

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