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Example 1:

public interface Adder {
    public int getSum();
}

public class AdderImpl implements Adder {
    private int v1;
    private int v2;
    public AdderImpl(final int v1, final int v2) {
        if (validate(v1,v2) == false) {
            throw some exception;
        }
        this.v1 = v1;
        this.v2 = v2;
    }
    public int getSum() {
        return this.v1+this.v2;
    }
}

Example 2:

public interface Adder {
    public int getSum(final int v1,final int v2);
}

public class AdderImpl implements Adder {

    public int getSum(final int v1, final int v2) {

        if (validate(v1,v2) == false) {
            throw some exception;
        }
        return v1+v2;
    }
}

Example 3:

public interface Adder {
    public int getSum();
}

public class AdderImpl implements Adder {

    private int sum;

    public AdderImpl(final int v1, final int v2) {
        if (validate(v1,v2) == false) {
            throw some exception;
        }
        this.sum = v1 + v2;
    }
    public int getSum() {
        return this.sum;
    }
}

I have simplified my production scenarios here into this simple class and interface.Example 1 has the disadvantage that if someone eyeballs the interface he will not be able to know the inputs on which the interface acts. Example 2 overcomes this advantage. By just looking at getSum interface user will be able to know the inputs on which interface acts. However if later on someone adds another function to this interface with Example 2 design and both interfaces are used then input validation will be repeated. Example 3 gives an obvious advantage of not computing the sum if caller calls getSum multiple times. For me all three of them works right now. I'm more confused between example 1 and example 2, the responsibility of input validation should be with constructor (example 2) or more easy to understand interface should be preferred (example 1) ?

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closed as not constructive by duffymo, Gamb, nhahtdh, Kal, Sotirios Delimanolis Apr 30 '13 at 13:52

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
What do you mean by "better"? How about adding some requirement or criteria? –  OldProgrammer Apr 30 '13 at 13:40
3  
It depends on you're using them. –  SLaks Apr 30 '13 at 13:40
1  
Shouldn't this go on Code Review? Obviously, with some more detail. –  mikeTheLiar Apr 30 '13 at 13:41
1  
They're all doing the same thing, which ever works for you or which ever you better understand, is the better choice. There is sometimes no single better way to do some things. –  Caveman42 Apr 30 '13 at 13:41
2  
Example 2 won't compile. –  GriffeyDog Apr 30 '13 at 13:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Rather than saying what's better, I would say it depends on your situation.

  1. This is good if you need to be able to access the individual members later. I would never use this in its current form, but if you were to add getter methods, it might be superior. You could improve the runtime performance at a slight cost to memory by precalculating the sum in advance (see version 3)
  2. This version is good if you want to reuse the class to add different things. It allows you to reuse functionality without having to create a new object. However, in this case your functionality is simple enough that it's not necessary to worry about that, but for more complicated scenarios this could be correct
    • By the way, this one won't compile, you should remove the this.
  3. This is exactly the same as #1, except that you only calculate the sum one time. By precalculating, you improve the runtime performance of this class. Notice that this version does not make the values available if you want to add a getter method later
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1 and 3 are stateful interfaces, you construct and instance which then effectively remembers some immuatable state about which it can be asked questions multiple times, always giving the same answer. We can imagine a more complex example encapsulating some larger data set and returning more derived values (eg. a data series for which we can calculate mean, mode, median standard deviation etc.) So 1 and 3 enable a producer consumer kind of relationship.

Whereas 2 allows the owner of some data simply to have a calculation performed on that data, the calculator retains no state. This seems appropriate when we need to encapsulate only the computations. As things stand we might use a Singleton for this computation class. In effect we are separating data from logic, and this may well mean we're not encapsulating things as well as we might.

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