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What is the best way to abstract or extract the common functionality from the classes below using OOP and C#?

Notes:

  • UPDATE: from an OOP point of view, the use of inheritance makes sense. However as I am mapping the classes to tables in my database I would prefer to keep the classes in sync with my tables.
  • UPDATE 2: I have created a Utility method and moved the common code there, keeping the property FullName and calling the utility method from within the FullName property, passing Name and StatusId as parameters. However I don't like this solution from an OOP perspective.
  • The classes below are used with Entity Framework Code First and are mapped to SQL-Views in my MS SQL server.
  • I am using MVC and in my View (cshtml file) I would like to use the following code: @model.FullName
  • The Logic within FullName is exactly the same in both classes, which have the same 2 common properties (Name and StatusId).
  • The property FullName is ignored in the Entity Framework mapping (as expected)
  • For simplicity the code below is just an example of what I'm trying to do. The logic within the common property(ies) is more complex and is used to abstract the logic to create a Description string for the web page (MVC).

Any suggestions?

public class User
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int StatusId { get; set; }

    public DateTime DateOfBirth { get; set; }
    public string PlaceOfBirth { get; set; }

    public string FullName
    {
        get
        {
            if (StatusId == 1)
                return string.Format("{0} (deleted)", Name);
            else if (StatusId == 2)
                return string.Format("{0} (approved)", Name);
            else
                return string.Format("{0} (awaiting approval)", Name);
        }
    }
}

public class Company
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int StatusId { get; set; }

    public int NumberOfEmployees { get; set; }
    public string Location { get; set; }

    public string FullName
    {
        get
        {
            if (StatusId == 1)
                return string.Format("{0} (deleted)", Name);
            else if (StatusId == 2)
                return string.Format("{0} (approved)", Name);
            else
                return string.Format("{0} (awaiting approval)", Name);
        }
    }
}
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closed as off topic by Servy, Ed Woodcock, Jean, thaJeztah, Adam Arold Apr 30 '13 at 21:42

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1  
Use inheritance? Your question is a bit vague. –  tnw Apr 30 '13 at 13:58
1  
1) Create a Thing class, move Name and StatusID to it and make User and Company inherit from it. 2) Code FullName inside the Thing base class. –  Andre Calil Apr 30 '13 at 13:59
    
@tnw, the classes represent Entities in my database (I am using Entity Framework as ORM) and I would like to keep them in sync with what I have in my database. So, in this case, I think inheritance may not be a good solution for the problem. –  AndreCruz Apr 30 '13 at 14:02
    
@AndreCalil, that makes sense. However considering that I'm mapping User and Company from my database, using inheritance here wouldn't be my preferred solution. Can you see any alternative? –  AndreCruz Apr 30 '13 at 14:03
1  
@AndreCruz You can write an extension method for each of the types. Both methods could be inside the same class, which would send the required properties to a single method that creates the full name. Got it? –  Andre Calil Apr 30 '13 at 14:05

2 Answers 2

public class User : EntityBase
{

    public DateTime DateOfBirth
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
    public string PlaceOfBirth
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

public class Company : EntityBase
{


    public int NumberOfEmployees
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
    public string Location
    {
        get;
        set;
    }


}

public abstract class EntityBase
{

    public virtual string Name
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
    public virtual string Name
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public virtual Int32 StatusId
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public virtual String FullName
    {
        get
        {
            if ( StatusId == 1 )
                return string.Format("{0} (deleted)", Name);
            else if ( StatusId == 2 )
                return string.Format("{0} (approved)", Name);
            else
                return string.Format("{0} (awaiting approval)", Name);
        }
    }
}

That would be my shot at it.

share|improve this answer
    
from an OOP point of view, the use of inheritance makes sense. However as I am mapping the classes to tables in my database I would prefer to keep the classes in sync with my tables. –  AndreCruz Apr 30 '13 at 14:06
1  
in that case, scratch the abstract and virtual keywords and use the base class in combination with a Table Per Hierarchy mapping –  b_meyer Apr 30 '13 at 14:10
    
that is a good point. If this is the only way to avoid a Utility method than your answer is correct. I would prefer however a different approach. If nobody comes with any suggestion I will mark your answer as correct. –  AndreCruz Apr 30 '13 at 14:25
    
@AndreCruz Why would you like a different approach? This is the OOP way, the best design and EF is compliant with it. What's wrong? –  Andre Calil Apr 30 '13 at 14:32
    
@AndreCalil there is nothing particularly wrong with it. I just think it is over complicated to change my mappings and use inheritance, just because of common properties / code, when actually User and Company are not related at all (ok, it's possible to abstract and create a base class, but not what I wanted). When I posted this question I should have been more precise that I wanted to see if by using interfaces or some other pattern it would be possible to achieve a simple solution. But with I have seen so far, it is better, but not nice, to use a Utility method. –  AndreCruz Apr 30 '13 at 14:40

Well, after considering the use of inheritance (and as a result Table Per Hierarchy Mapping as I am using Entity Framework) and the use of a static Utility class, I have concluded that, for the purpose of my example, the easiest and best solution was to create an Interface and pass the interface to the Utility class / Helper method. This helps to avoid passing string Name, int StatusId to the method and keep things more consistent. This also means that I don't need to change my entities. Reason: I wanted to keep the mapping consistent between the Entity classes and SQL tables. The use of inheritance could be an option if it was motivated by data mapping, not a simple property to format a Description string.

public class User : INameStatusEntity
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int StatusId { get; set; }

    public DateTime DateOfBirth { get; set; }
    public string PlaceOfBirth { get; set; }

    public string FullName
    {
        get
        {
            return Utility.FormatFullName(this);
        }
    }
}

public class Company : INameStatusEntity
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int StatusId { get; set; }

    public int NumberOfEmployees { get; set; }
    public string Location { get; set; }

    public string FullName
    {
        get
        {
            return Utility.FormatFullName(this);
        }
    }
}

public interface INameStatusEntity
{
    string Name { get; }
    int StatusId { get; }
    string FullName { get; }
}

public class Utility
{
    public static string FormatFullName(INameStatusEntity nameStatusEntity)
    {
        if (nameStatusEntity.StatusId == 1)
            return string.Format("{0} (deleted)", nameStatusEntity.Name);
        else if (nameStatusEntity.StatusId == 2)
            return string.Format("{0} (approved)", nameStatusEntity.Name);
        else
            return string.Format("{0} (awaiting approval)", nameStatusEntity.Name);
    }
}
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