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I'm switching from Ruby to Python for a project. I appreciate the fact that Python has first-class functions and closures, so this question ought to be easy. I just haven't figured out what is idiomatically correct for Python:

In Ruby, I could write:

def with_quietude(level, &block)
  begin
    saved_gval = gval
    gval = level
    yield
  ensure
    gval = saved_gval
  end
end

and call it like this:

with_quietude(3) {
  razz_the_jazz
  begin_the_beguine
}

(Note: I'm not asking about Python try/finally handling nor about saving and restoring variables -- I just wanted a non-trivial example of wrapping a block inside some other code.)

update

Or, since some of the answers are getting hung up on the global assignments in the previous example when I'm really asking about closures, what if the call was as follows? (Note that this doesn't change the definition of with_quietude):

def frumble(x)
  with_quietude {
    razz_the_jazz(x)
    begin_the_beguine(2 * x)
  }
end

How would you implement something similar in Python (and not get laughed at by the Python experts)?

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1  
Python doesn't really have this construct. yield is mainly used to implement iterators. You can kinda sorta make them do what you want but function decorators or context managers are a better approach. (In fact, contextlib does this sort of "hack" for you.) –  millimoose Apr 30 '13 at 14:00
    
Can you explain what the yield statement is doing there in ruby? I took a stab at the answer, but I have no idea if it's right since I don't know ruby ... –  mgilson Apr 30 '13 at 14:03
    
yield in Ruby gives up control to the &block which was passed in - essentially, he's asking for a way to pass in and run an arbitrary chunk of code. –  Hannele Apr 30 '13 at 14:06
    
By the way, thanks for asking this one. I've been meaning to look into learning ruby for a while now. I suppose this is one thing that I'll be a little closer to knowing how to use. –  mgilson Apr 30 '13 at 14:18
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Looking more into ruby's yield, it looks like you want something like contextlib.contextmanager:

from contextlib import contextmanager

def razz_the_jazz():
    print gval

@contextmanager
def quietude(level):
    global gval
    saved_gval = gval
    gval = level

    try:
        yield
    finally:
        gval = saved_gval

gval = 1

with quietude(3):
     razz_the_jazz()

razz_the_jazz()

This script outputs:

3
1

indicating that our context manager did reset gval in the global namespace. Of course, I wouldn't use this context manager since it only works in the global namespace. (It won't work with locals in a function) for example.

This is basically a limitation of how assignment creates a new reference to an object and that you can never mutate an object by assignment to it directly. (The only way to mutate an object is to assign to one of it's attributes or via __setitem__ (a[x] = whatever))

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However, you should be able to communicate between the scopes using attributes of the context object somehow. (Although that doesn't seem to be needed in the OP's example –  millimoose Apr 30 '13 at 14:20
    
@millimoose -- You seem to know what the ruby is doing and I have no doubt that you know how to use contextlib. Why not write up an answer so I can learn something? :-P –  mgilson Apr 30 '13 at 14:22
    
Alas, stuck on a phone for now :P Anyway, given the OP's example where the block doesn't really do anything with the locals in with_quietude() this answer is essentially what I'd have come up with. –  millimoose Apr 30 '13 at 14:25
    
I think the Python equivalent would have quietude() as a method on the class, and would read and assign to self.gval. That way no global variable would be needed. –  user4815162342 Apr 30 '13 at 14:43
    
@mgilson (and millimoose): I updated my example to show that the yield block is NOT interested in the global vars and is instead a full-fledged closure with access to the local variables in which it was created. Does that change the answer? –  fearless_fool Apr 30 '13 at 16:22
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A word of warning if you are coming from Ruby: All python 'def's are basically the same as ruby 'proc's.

Python doesn't have an equivalent for ruby's 'def'

You can get very similar behaviour to what you are asking for by defining your own functions in the scope of the calling function

def quietude(level, my_func):
    saved_gval = gval
    gval = level
    my_func()

def my_func():
  razz_the_jazz()
  begin_the_beguine()

quietude(3, my_func)

---- EDIT: Request for further information: -----

Python's lambdas are limited to one line so they are not as flexible as ruby's.

To pass functions with arguments around I would recommend partial functions see the below code:

import functools

def run(a, b):
    print a
    print b

def runner(value, func):
    func(value)

def start():
    s = functools.partial(run, 'first')
    runner('second', s)

---- Edit 2 More information ----

Python functions are only called when the '()' is added to them. This is different from ruby where the '()' are optional. The below code runs 'b_method' in start() and 'a_method' in run()

def a_method():
    print 'a_method is running'
    return 'a'

def b_method():
    print 'b_method is running'
    return 'b'

def run(a, b):
    print a()
    print b

def start():
    run(a_method, b_method())
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This feels closer. Unlike Ruby's proc, Python's def doesn't return a value, so you can't do quietude(3, def my_func(): ...). But if you want to pass args (but defer the evaluation until you're inside quietude(), you CAN wrap it in a lambda, like quietude(3, lambda: my_func('coltrane')). Is that how you'd do it? –  fearless_fool Apr 30 '13 at 16:39
    
python functions are called when you add the '()'. If you pass 'func()' in it will execute the function called func and pass the result in. If you pass 'func' in then it will not execute func until you call it with '()' –  andy boot Apr 30 '13 at 17:01
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I like the answer that mgilson gives, so it gets the check. This is just a small expansion on the capabilities of @contextmanager for someone coming from the Ruby world.

gval = 0

from contextlib import contextmanager

@contextmanager
def quietude(level):
    global gval
    saved_gval = gval
    gval = level
    try:
        yield
    finally:
        gval = saved_gval

def bebop(x):
  with quietude(3):
    print "first", x*2, "(gval =", gval, ")"
    print "second", x*4, "(gval =", gval, ")"

bebop(100)
bebop("xxxx")

This prints out:

first 200 (gval = 3 )
second 400 (gval = 3 )
first xxxxxxxx (gval = 3 )
second xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx (gval = 3 )

This shows that everything within the scope of the with has access to the lexically closed variables, and behaves more or less the way someone coming from the Ruby world would expect.

Good stuff.

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