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I just came across another problem with WPF.

I have a collection of custom controls (composite ones; made of a border inside a grid etc.).

I'm controlling their Background color via triggers as well as binding. I want them to get a bit darker on a mouseover (achieved by triggers and a custom IValueConverter), but also to change color when select (that is, clicked on). The latter is done by a regular Setter.

<Grid Width="150" Height="50" Margin="5">
    <Border CornerRadius="3" BorderBrush="Black" BorderThickness="0.5" >
        <Border.Resources>
            <local:BackgroundConverter x:Key="ColorConverter"/>
        </Border.Resources>
        <Border.Style>
            <Style TargetType="Border">                    
                <Style.Triggers>
                    <Trigger Property="Grid.IsMouseOver" Value="True">
                        <Setter Property="Background" Value="{Binding Path=MyStatus, Converter={StaticResource ColorConverter}}"/>
                    </Trigger>
                    <Trigger Property="Grid.IsMouseOver" Value="False">
                        <Setter Property="Background" Value="{Binding Path=MyStatus, Converter={StaticResource ColorConverter}}"/>
                    </Trigger>
                </Style.Triggers>
                <Setter Property="Background" Value="{Binding Path=MyStatus, Converter={StaticResource ColorConverter}}"/>
            </Style>
        </Border.Style>
        <Grid>                
            <Grid.RowDefinitions>
                <RowDefinition Height="0.6*"/>
                <RowDefinition Height="0.5*"/>
            </Grid.RowDefinitions>                                
            <TextBlock Grid.Row="0" FontSize="14" TextAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center" FontWeight="Bold">                    
                <Label Foreground="{Binding Path=TextColor}" Content="{Binding Path=ID}"/>
            </TextBlock>
            <TextBlock Grid.Row="1" FontSize="9" TextAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Top" Margin="0" Padding="0">
                <Label Content="{Binding Path=StockName}"/>
            </TextBlock>
        </Grid>
    </Border>
</Grid>

The mouseover effect works correctly until I click one of the controls. Triggers stop working at that point (apart from the controls that haven't been clicked on).

I'm a bit baffled. How can I put binding to some use without disabling the triggers?

I'll supply more details if necessary.


@Rachel

Can you post your converter code later on? I don't see how the IsMouseOver property is getting passed to the converter, so it's probably a static value that's not updated when it changes. And since the value doesn't change when it's triggered, its likely not bothering to re-evaluate the value. You might be better off using a IMutliValueConverter and passing it IsMouseOver and MyStatus, so it gets reevaluated anytime either of those two values change

I didn't use a IMultiValueConverter. For that purpose I created my own "composite" object that includes IsMouseOver. This is necessary because the background color is supposed to be calculated both out of my own data (whether an item is selected, or mapped) as well as the mouse over (whatever the background color, it's supposed to darken slightly on a mouse over).

Converter code:

public class BackgroundConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("BackgroundConverter.Convert()");
        if (!(value is StockViewBackgroundStatus))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("value");
        }
        var casted = (StockViewBackgroundStatus)value;
        if (casted.IsNone)
        {
            if (casted.IsMouseOver)
            {
                return new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Gray);
            }
            else
            {
                return CreateLinearGradient(Colors.Gray, false);
            }
        }
        switch (casted.Status)
        {
            case StockItem.Status.Mapped:
                {
                    return CreateLinearGradient(Color.FromRgb(83, 165, 18), casted.IsMouseOver);
                }
            case StockItem.Status.MappedElsewhere:
                {
                    return CreateLinearGradient(Color.FromRgb(104, 189, 36), casted.IsMouseOver);
                }
            case StockItem.Status.NotMapped:
                {
                    return CreateLinearGradient(Colors.LightGray, casted.IsMouseOver);
                }
            default:
                {
                    throw new NotImplementedException(casted.Status.ToString());
                }
        }            
    }

    private static LinearGradientBrush CreateLinearGradient(Color initial, bool darker)
    {
        var darkened = darker ? 0.1 : 0;
        return new LinearGradientBrush(
            Lighten(initial, 1.05 - darkened),
            Lighten(initial, 0.95 - darkened), 
            90);
    }

    private static Color Lighten(Color initial, double factor)
    {
        Func<double, double> trunc = (value) => (Math.Max(0, Math.Min(255, value)));
        var resulting = Color.FromRgb(
            System.Convert.ToByte(trunc(initial.R * factor)),
            System.Convert.ToByte(trunc(initial.G * factor)),
            System.Convert.ToByte(trunc(initial.B * factor)));
        return resulting;
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("BackgroundConverter.ConvertBack()");
        return value;
    }
}

StockItem object

public partial class StockItem : UserControl, INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private bool _empty;
    public StockItem()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        DataContext = this;
    }

    private string _id;
    public string ID
    {
        get
        {
            return _id;
        }
        set
        {
            _id = value;
            RaisePropertyChanged("ID");
        }

    }

    public Brush TextColor
    {
        get
        {                
            Color color = IsSelected ? Colors.White : Colors.Black;
            return new SolidColorBrush(color);
        }
    }

    private string _stockName;
    public string StockName
    {
        get
        {
            return _stockName;
        }
        set
        {
            _stockName = value;
            RaisePropertyChanged("StockName");
        }
    }

    StockViewBackgroundStatus _status;
    public StockViewBackgroundStatus MyStatus
    {
        get
        {
            return new StockViewBackgroundStatus()
            {
                IsMouseOver = this.IsMouseOver,
                IsNone = IsEmpty,
                Status = MappingStatus
            };
        }
        set
        {
            _status = value;
            Debug.WriteLine("in " + ID + "...");
            Debug.WriteLine("RaisePropertyChanged(\"IsMouseOver\")");
            Debug.WriteLine("RaisePropertyChanged(\"MyStatus\")");

            RaisePropertyChanged("IsMouseOver"); // added, but doesn't help
            RaisePropertyChanged("MyStatus");
        }
    }

    public bool IsEmpty
    {
        get
        {
            return _empty;
        }
    }

    public static StockItem EmptyStock
    {
        get
        {
            return new StockItem()
            {
                _empty = true,
                ID = "none",
                Name = String.Empty
            };
        }
    }

    internal EventHandler Selected
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    private Status _mappingStatus;
    public Status MappingStatus
    {
        get
        {
            return _mappingStatus;
        }
        set
        {
            _mappingStatus = value;
            Debug.WriteLine("in " + ID + "...");
            Debug.WriteLine("RaisePropertyChanged(\"MappingStatus\")");
            Debug.WriteLine("RaisePropertyChanged(\"TextColor\")");
            RaisePropertyChanged("MappingStatus");
            RaisePropertyChanged("TextColor");

            MyStatus = new StockViewBackgroundStatus() { IsMouseOver = this.IsMouseOver, IsNone = _empty, Status = value };                

            if (value == Status.Mapped && Selected != null)
            {
                Selected(this, null);
            }
        }
    }

    public bool IsSelected
    {
        get
        {
            return MappingStatus == Status.Mapped;
        }
    }

    public enum Status
    {            
        Mapped,
        MappedElsewhere,
        NotMapped
    }

    protected void RaisePropertyChanged(string property)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged == null)
        {
            return;
        }
        PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(property));
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
}

The view class encapsulating the collection (the one that I'm actually setting as the DataContext)

public class TargetStocks
{
    public ObservableCollection<StockItem> AllStocks
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public void Add(StockItem sv, EventHandler selected)
    {
        if (sv == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("sv");
        }
        sv.MouseDown += sv_MouseDown;
        if (selected != null)
        {
            sv.Selected += selected;
        }
        if (AllStocks == null)
        {
            AllStocks = new ObservableCollection<StockItem>();
        }
        AllStocks.Add(sv);
    }

    public void AddRange(IEnumerable<StockItem> stocks, EventHandler selected)
    {
        foreach (var stock in stocks)
        {
            Add(stock, selected);
        }
    }

    void sv_MouseDown(object sender, System.Windows.Input.MouseButtonEventArgs e)
    {
        if (!(sender is StockItem))
        {
            return;
        }
        var sv = (StockItem)sender;
        foreach (StockItem stock in AllStocks)
        {
            if (stock.MappingStatus == StockItem.Status.Mapped)
            {
                // this seems to kill the trigger
                stock.MappingStatus = StockItem.Status.NotMapped;
            }
            if (stock == sv && sv.MappingStatus != StockItem.Status.Mapped)
            {
                // as above
                stock.MappingStatus = StockItem.Status.Mapped;
            }
        }
    }
}

What happens, as shown by debugging, is that prior to clicking any of the stock items (or before the MappingStatus of any of them is changed) the mouseover effect works without triggering the converter at all.

Convert is not called at all.

It's setting the MappingStatus in the MouseDown event handler that seems to disable (or detach) the trigger.

share|improve this question
3  
Can you edit your question to include the Click code that changes the background color? Also, is your Click event setting the source property in the binding, or the Background property of the border? If it's the 2nd, Depdencey Property Precedence dictates that values set on the object itself take precedence over styled or triggered values. –  Rachel Apr 30 '13 at 14:35
    
As @Rachel asks - what is your Click doing? –  XAMeLi Apr 30 '13 at 14:37
    
Also maybe I'm missing something, but don't your Triggers all return the same value? They both set Status to {Binding Path=MyStatus, Converter={StaticResource ColorConverter}}, which also is the same value as the default Setter, so your Background color will remain static regardless of if the mouse is over it or not... –  Rachel Apr 30 '13 at 14:43
    
@Rachel @XAMeLi the Click is resetting MyStatus (raising INotifyPropertyChanged.PropertyChanged event) of all child items (all of them, as when the clicked one gets selected, the rest is thereby unselected) –  Konrad Morawski Apr 30 '13 at 16:25
    
@Rachel - the converter takes IsMouseOver property into account. Thanks to that it initially works. The thing is that the triggers are disabled (?) and from that point the converter is not used anymore (verified by debugging the code). –  Konrad Morawski Apr 30 '13 at 16:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Bindings don't get re-evaluated as a result of a normal trigger firing.

You can change the property to a new binding object, however the bindings itself only gets evaluated the first time it's used as a result of the trigger.

So when your IsMouseOver property changes, the Background property is changing from one Binding object to another Binding object, however the binding itself is not getting re-evaluated.

If you raise a PropertyChange notification on the bound value though, the binding will get re-evaluated.

As a test, add a Debug line or breakpoint to your converter, and test it with triggering a PropertyChanged notification on the bound value. You'll see it gets hit when it receives a change notification and re-evaluates.

If you want a bound value to be evaluated when one of multiple properties change, use an IMultiValueConverter.

share|improve this answer
    
back from holidays; I updated my question accordingly. Thanks for help :( –  Konrad Morawski May 6 '13 at 9:52
    
@KonradMorawski Thanks. Based on your code, you should definitely consider switching to an IMultiValueConverter, as bindings don't get reevaluated if the IsMouseOver or MappingStatus changes, or if the MyStatus value doesn't actually change to a new value. You can create an IMultiValueConverter that accepts both the IsMouseOver property from the UI, and the MappingStatus and IsSelected properties from the data. –  Rachel May 6 '13 at 12:08
    
thanks, I'll try that. But why does it (currently) work properly only until clicked? –  Konrad Morawski May 6 '13 at 12:11
1  
@KonradMorawski It only evaluates the bound value once the first time the trigger occurs, and caches the result of that. Moving your mouse over stores ColorA and moving it off stores ColorB, so the color will change when moving back and forth over it without re-evaluating the converter, but when you trigger a PropertyChange notification on MyStatus in the Click event, both bindings get re-evaluated and the cached value for both triggers is updated to the IsMouseOver color, since the mouse is over the item at the time it's clicked. –  Rachel May 6 '13 at 12:18
    
Thanks for the explanation. I'll go and try with IMultiValueConverter. Answer accepted –  Konrad Morawski May 6 '13 at 12:23

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