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I am using the async library's parallel function, but I am running into a weird problem. I loop through an array of objects to create an array of functions called people. People gets passed into async's parallel method to execute in parallel. However, when I take a look at the parameter "people" that actually get passed into the "printFunction" it is wrong. The people parameter is always the last object in my people array.

So in this example, the console log in printFunction would print

{ 'name' : 'jar jar binks' }
{ 'name' : 'jar jar binks' }

Code:

var people = [{ 'name' : 'obi wan kenobi'}, { 'name' : 'jar jar binks' }];

// Create an array of tasks to be processed.
for(var i = 0; i < people.length; i++) {
  tasks.push( function(callback) {
    setTimeout( makePrintFunction(people[i], callback), 200); 
  });
}

// Process those tasks.
async.parallel(tasks, function(err, stuff) {
  // ...do some stuff with the returned array here.
});

Make Print Function:

function makePrintFunction(people, next) {
  return validateAndTrackFlag(people, next);
}

function printFunction(people, next) {
  console.log(people);        // Always prints: { 'name' : 'jar jar binks' }
  next(null, true)
}

Obviously this is not the real code, I just changed the names and objects.

Thanks for any help in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Since you're using an array, perhaps async.each or async.eachSeries make more sense than using async.parallel. –  robertklep Apr 30 '13 at 16:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is not an async problem, it's a closure problem.

Try this:

for(var i = 0; i < people.length; i++) {
  (function (i){
    tasks.push( function(callback) {
      setTimeout( makePrintFunction(people[i], callback), 200); 
    });
  })(i)
}

Or this:

people.forEach (function (p){
  tasks.push( function(callback) {
    setTimeout( makePrintFunction(p, callback), 200); 
  });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Damn, 2 min late –  Gabriel Llamas Apr 30 '13 at 15:31

You are dealing with classical scoping issue. Try this:

for(var i = 0; i < people.length; i++) {
  (function(i) {
    tasks.push( function(callback) {
      setTimeout( makePrintFunction(people[i], callback), 200); 
    });
  })(i);
}

or even better

var create_scope = function(i) {
  tasks.push( function(callback) {
    setTimeout( makePrintFunction(people[i], callback), 200); 
  });
};
for (var i = 0; i < people.length; i++) {
  create_scope(i);
}

or the best:

people.forEach(function(person) {
  tasks.push( function(callback) {
    setTimeout( makePrintFunction(person, callback), 200); 
  });
});

This happens because for loop does not create a scope, i.e. when functions are fired i is the last index. Now functions do create scope, so inside anonymous function i is the expected value.

share|improve this answer
    
Or people.forEach(function(person) { ... }). –  robertklep Apr 30 '13 at 15:31
    
Don't copy my answer :) –  Gabriel Llamas Apr 30 '13 at 15:31
    
Oh dang you beat me :) (although the first argument of the callback to forEach will be the array item and not the index :) –  robertklep Apr 30 '13 at 15:32
    
lol ya I saw that copy, thank you for the answer though –  Scott Apr 30 '13 at 15:35
    
Yeah, it was so obvious, that I didn't think that there might be a mistake. :) –  freakish Apr 30 '13 at 15:36

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