Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was reading this site:

http://www.nvidia.com/object/cuda_what_is.html

and I wanted to find out some more generic information on the ideas behind GPU computing (including the history on using this for computation and benefits over using CPUs)

Does anyone have any good articles that are not too difficult to digest?

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I personally find the GPGPU Wikipedia Entry quite instructive.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This presentation on parallel computing is great, and I think it will help you understand GPU computing benefits:

http://newport.eecs.uci.edu/~sjenks/Presentations/Ubiquitous%20Parallel%20Computing.pdf

It goes over CPUs vs GPUs, including a discussion on CUDA and OpenCL.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can find the architecture of the gpu in this document (CUDA programming guide): How the processing units are organised and what instructions you can use:

http://developer.download.nvidia.com/compute/cuda/2_3/toolkit/docs/NVIDIA_CUDA_Programming_Guide_2.3.pdf

Here are some more about CUDA:

http://www.nvidia.com/object/cuda_develop.html

Here you can find general information about gpgpu:

GPGPU: http://gpgpu.org/

share|improve this answer
    
is CUDA NVidia specific, i am looking for the general information that is not tied to one brand –  leora Oct 27 '09 at 12:16
add comment

This is a good place to start.

I think the white paper on Fermi is a good read too.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This link contains the Chapter slides from the famous book on GPU programming by Dr. Hwu(@UIUC). Chapters 1 and 2 slides specifically give a introduction to, as why/how Graphics Cards are now being looked at as Computing Units, without being too esoteric.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.