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I have a Table such that looks like the following:

ID         TID        TNAME     CID     CNAME     SEQUENCE
-----------------------------------------------------------
200649     6125     Schalke    356954   Mirko         1
200749     6125     Schalke    356954   Mirko         1
200849     6125     Schalke    439386   Fred          1
200849     6125     Schalke    356954   Mirko         1
200849     6125     Schalke    495881   Michael       1
200949     6125     Schalke    401312   Felix         1
200949     6125     Schalke    495881   Michael       2

I would like to query this table so it only returns if ID and SEQUENCE are duplicated. i.e. it should only return:

200849     6125     Schalke    439386   Fred          1
200849     6125     Schalke    356954   Mirko         1
200849     6125     Schalke    495881   Michael       1

I have used having count(ID) > 1 but it will not return anything since CIDs are all unique.

Thanks for your help!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think this is a way to do it:

select a.*
from yourTable as a
inner join (
    select id, sequence 
    from yourTable 
    group by id, sequence 
    having count(id)>1) as b on a.id = b.id and a.sequence=b.sequence
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Thank you so much! –  user1683987 Apr 30 '13 at 16:57

Something like this?

SELECT b.id, 
       b.tid, 
       b.tname, 
       b.cid, 
       b.cname, 
       b.sequence 
FROM   (SELECT id, 
               sequence, 
               Count(*) CNT 
        FROM   table1 
        GROUP  BY id, 
                  sequence 
        HAVING Count(*) > 1) a 
       LEFT JOIN table1 b 
              ON b.id = a.id 
                 AND b.sequence = a.sequence 

Result

|     ID |  TID |   TNAME |    CID |   CNAME | SEQUENCE |
---------------------------------------------------------
| 200849 | 6125 | Schalke | 439386 |    Fred |        1 |
| 200849 | 6125 | Schalke | 356954 |   Mirko |        1 |
| 200849 | 6125 | Schalke | 495881 | Michael |        1 |

See the demo

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You don't need to join on sequence - id is enough (it is the key after all - all other columns are unnecessary to identify the row) –  Bohemian Apr 30 '13 at 15:45
    
@Bohemian If you were right, then there wouldn't be duplicate entries in the Id column –  Barranka Apr 30 '13 at 15:47
    
@Bohemian On second look, since id & sequence make the unique pair, I think sequence needs to be joined as well. –  Kermit Apr 30 '13 at 15:48
    
Wait! @Barranka is right. The id column is not an id column! Look at the data - id is not unique. At this point, the OP should probably rip it all up and start again :/ –  Bohemian Apr 30 '13 at 15:50
    
@Bohemian I think there's a unique composite key we're not seeing. –  Kermit Apr 30 '13 at 15:53

I like using analytic functions for these things:

select t.*
from (select t.*, count(*) over (partition by id, sequence) as cnt
      from t
     ) t
where cnt > 1

This also gives you the number of duplicates on each row in the output.

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Was trying to use same approach. Use this SQL Fiddle code sample if you like. –  Yaroslav Apr 30 '13 at 15:48

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