Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have trouble to optimize a request with the MySQL InnoDB optimizer. The following query (query 1) runs efficiently:

explain select * from ah_problems
where rnid in (6022342, 6256614, 5842714, 6302489)
and fieldid in (5,6);

and the plan (plan 1) is as follows:

id select_type table       type  possible_keys                   key           key_len ref rows Extra
=  ======      =========== ===== =============================== ============= ======= === ==== =====
1  SIMPLE      ah_problems range CONSTRAINTFIELDID,RNID__FIELDID RNID__FIELDID 8           33   Using where

So far, so good.

Whereas the slightly modified query (query 2) below will take a catastrophic execution plan:

explain select * from ah_problems
where rnid in (select rec.rnid as record_id from ar_records rec where rnid in (6022342, 6256614, 5842714, 6302489))
and fieldid in (5, 6)

The result is the same, but the plan (plan 2) is now doing this:

id select_type        table       type            possible_keys      key      key_len ref  rows     Extra
=  ======             =========== =====           ================== ======== ======= ==== =======  =====
1  PRIMARY            ah_problems ALL             CONSTRAINTFIELDID                        36177754 Using where
2  DEPENDENT SUBQUERY rec         unique_subquery PRIMARY            PRIMARY  4       func 1        Using index; Using where

If you wonder, that new sub-query...

select rec.rnid as record_id from ar_records rec where rnid in (6022342, 6256614, 5842714, 6302489)

...does nothing more than returning the four rows that were hard-coded in query 1:

6022342
6256614
5842714
6302489

so queries (1) and (2) are equivalent.

Guess what, I need query 2, and not one. And I want query 2 to be as efficient as query 1. I tried the following:

  1. Query 3: Add FORCE INDEX(RNID_FIELDID) to query 2. MySQL simply ignores it.

    explain select * from ah_problems force index (rnid__fieldid) where rnid in (select rec.rnid as record_id from ar_records rec where rnid in (6022342, 6256614, 5842714, 6302489)) and fieldid in (5,6)

The execution plan is the same as plan 2.

  1. Query 4: Add an ORDER BY RNID, FIELDID to query 3. I saw on some other questions that this might trick the optimizer. It doesn't help.

    explain select * from ah_problems force index (rnid__fieldid) where rnid in (select rec.rnid as record_id from ar_records rec where rnid in (6022342, 6256614, 5842714, 6302489)) and fieldid in (5, 6) order by rnid, fieldid

The plan 4 is now using the index, but the row count is still catastrophic:

id select_type        table       type            possible_keys      key           key_len ref  rows      Extra
=  ======             =========== =====           ================== ========      ======= ==== =======   =====
1  PRIMARY            ah_problems index                              RNID__FIELDID 8             36179307 Using where
2  DEPENDENT SUBQUERY rec         unique_subquery PRIMARY            PRIMARY       4       func  1        Using index; Using where

If this helps, this is the definition of my ah_problems tables. I'm unfortunately not able to change the definition of the table. Is there anything I can do to make MySQL optimizer use plan 1 to attack table ah_problems in query 2?

CREATE TABLE `ah_problems` (
  `ID` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT COMMENT 'Identifier for update statements',
  `RNID` int(11) NOT NULL COMMENT 'Record number',
  `FIELDID` int(11) NOT NULL COMMENT 'Which field is value in',
  `VALUE` varchar(255) NOT NULL COMMENT 'The value the field got on MODIFIED_DATE',
  `PREVIOUSID` int(11) DEFAULT NULL COMMENT 'Reference to previous value',
  `MODIFIED_DATE` datetime NOT NULL COMMENT 'When was it changed',
  `MODIFIED_GROUPID` int(11) DEFAULT NULL COMMENT 'In what group did modified_userid change it',
  `MODIFIED_USERID` int(11) NOT NULL COMMENT 'Who changed it',
  PRIMARY KEY (`ID`),
  KEY `CONSTRAINTFIELDID` (`FIELDID`),
  KEY `CONSTRAINTMODIFIED_GROUPID` (`MODIFIED_GROUPID`),
  KEY `CONSTRAINTMODIFIED_USERID` (`MODIFIED_USERID`),
  KEY `CONSTRAINTPREVIOUSID` (`PREVIOUSID`),
  KEY `RNID__FIELDID` (`RNID`,`FIELDID`),
  CONSTRAINT `HPRB_FIELD` FOREIGN KEY (`FIELDID`) REFERENCES `ad_fields` (`ID`),
  CONSTRAINT `HPRB_MODIFIED_GROUP` FOREIGN KEY (`MODIFIED_GROUPID`) REFERENCES `ap_groups` (`ID`),
  CONSTRAINT `HPRB_MODIFIED_USER` FOREIGN KEY (`MODIFIED_USERID`) REFERENCES `ap_users` (`ID`),
  CONSTRAINT `HPRB_PREVIOUS` FOREIGN KEY (`PREVIOUSID`) REFERENCES `ah_problems` (`ID`) ON DELETE CASCADE,
  CONSTRAINT `HPRB_RN` FOREIGN KEY (`RNID`) REFERENCES `ar_records` (`RNID`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=72305308 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COMMENT='PTR history'$$
share|improve this question
    
If query 1 and 2 are equivalent, then you must not be using 2 as you wrote it if query 1 doesn't work. Is there some issue you have that prevents 1 from working? Any info may help give better answers. –  dlp Apr 30 '13 at 16:53
    
Query 1 works. Query 2 works, but is slow. In fact, both queries are attempts to isolate the issue with the optimizer. My actual query is in fact more complex (the added sub-query fetches dynamically the list of records to get). –  Gerard Yin Apr 30 '13 at 16:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

MySQL cannot optimize the IN subquery to be leading (executed only once), it's always executed for each record in the main query in a loop.

Replace it with a join:

SELECT ahp.*
FROM   ar_records ar
JOIN   ah_problems ahp
ON     ahp.rnid = ar.rnid
       AND ahp.fieldId IN (5, 6)
WHERE  ar.rnid IN (6022342, 6256614, 5842714, 6302489)
share|improve this answer
    
Great analysis and explanation. Thanks for your time. –  Gerard Yin Apr 30 '13 at 17:06

I believe MySQL needs to resolve the WHERE fieldid IN (5, 6) before the subquery. Try adding the following index:

ALTER TABLE ah_problems ADD INDEX FIELDID__RNID (FIELDID, RNID);

If it does not help, rewrite your query as a JOIN:

SELECT *
FROM ah_problems
JOIN ar_records USING (rnid)
WHERE rnid in (6022342, 6256614, 5842714, 6302489)
AND fieldid in (5, 6)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. +1 for your time. Unfortunately, I cannot add indexes. I'll go for the join. –  Gerard Yin Apr 30 '13 at 17:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.