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The following code results in use of unassigned local variable "numberOfGroups":

int numberOfGroups;
if(options.NumberOfGroups == null || !int.TryParse(options.NumberOfGroups, out numberOfGroups))
{
    numberOfGroups = 10;
}

However, this code works fine (though, ReSharper says the = 10 is redundant):

int numberOfGroups = 10;
if(options.NumberOfGroups == null || !int.TryParse(options.NumberOfGroups, out numberOfGroups))
{
    numberOfGroups = 10;
}

Am I missing something, or is the compiler not liking my ||?

I've narrowed this down to dynamic causing the issues (options was a dynamic variable in my above code). The question still remains, why can't I do this?

This code doesn't compile:

internal class Program
{
    #region Static Methods

    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        dynamic myString = args[0];

        int myInt;
        if(myString == null || !int.TryParse(myString, out myInt))
        {
            myInt = 10;
        }

        Console.WriteLine(myInt);
    }

    #endregion
}

However, this code does:

internal class Program
{
    #region Static Methods

    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var myString = args[0]; // var would be string

        int myInt;
        if(myString == null || !int.TryParse(myString, out myInt))
        {
            myInt = 10;
        }

        Console.WriteLine(myInt);
    }

    #endregion
}

I didn't realize dynamic would be a factor in this.

share|improve this question
    
Don't think it's smart enough to know that you aren't using the value passed in to your out param as input –  Charleh Apr 30 '13 at 17:05
3  
The code given here does not demonstrate the described behaviour; it works just fine. Please post code that actually demonstrates the behaviour you're describing that we can compile ourselves. Give us the whole file. –  Eric Lippert Apr 30 '13 at 17:22
7  
Ah, now we have something interesting! –  Eric Lippert Apr 30 '13 at 17:24
1  
It's not too surprising that the compiler is confused by this. The helper code for the dynamic call site probably has some control flow that don't guarantee assignment to the out param. It's certainly interesting to consider what helper code the compiler should produce to avoid the issue, or if that's even possible. –  CodesInChaos Apr 30 '13 at 17:26
1  
At first glance this is sure looking like a bug. –  Eric Lippert Apr 30 '13 at 17:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 69 down vote accepted

I am pretty sure this is a compiler bug. Nice find!

Here's a minimal repro:

class Program
{
    static bool M(out int x) 
    { 
        x = 123; 
        return true; 
    }
    static int N(dynamic d)
    {
        int y;
        if(d || M(out y))
            y = 10;
        return y; 
    }
}

I see no reason why that should be illegal; if you replace dynamic with bool it compiles just fine.

I'm actually meeting with the C# team tomorrow; I'll mention it to them. Apologies for the error!

share|improve this answer
6  
I'm just glad to know that I'm not going crazy :) I've since updated my code to only rely on TryParse, so I'm set for now. Thanks for your insight! –  Brandon Martinez Apr 30 '13 at 17:39
4  
@NominSim: Suppose the runtime analysis fails: then an exception is thrown before the local is read. Suppose the runtime analysis succeeds: then at runtime either d is true and y is set, or d is false and M sets y. Either way, y is set. The fact that the analysis is deferred until runtime doesn't change anything. –  Eric Lippert Apr 30 '13 at 17:52
2  
In case anyone's curious: I just checked, and the Mono compiler gets it right. imgur.com/g47oquT –  Dan Tao Apr 30 '13 at 18:34
15  
I think the compiler behavior is actually correct, since the value of d may be of a type with an overloaded true operator. I've posted an answer with an example where neither branch is taken. –  Quartermeister Apr 30 '13 at 19:14
2  
@Quartermeister in which case the Mono compiler is getting it wrong :) –  Porges May 7 '13 at 20:56

It's possible for the variable to be unassigned if the value of the dynamic expression is of a type with an overloaded true operator.

The || operator will invoke the true operator to decide whether to evaluate the right-hand side, and then the if statement will invoke the true operator to decide whether to evaluate the its body. For a normal bool, these will always return the same result and so exactly one will be evaluated, but for a user-defined operator there is no such guarantee!

Building off of Eric Lippert's repro, here is a short and complete program that demonstrates a case where neither path would be executed and the variable would have its initial value:

using System;

class Program
{
    static bool M(out int x)
    {
        x = 123;
        return true;
    }

    static int N(dynamic d)
    {
        int y = 3;
        if (d || M(out y))
            y = 10;
        return y;
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var result = N(new EvilBool());
        // Prints 3!
        Console.WriteLine(result);
    }
}

class EvilBool
{
    private bool value;

    public static bool operator true(EvilBool b)
    {
        // Return true the first time this is called
        // and false the second time
        b.value = !b.value;
        return b.value;
    }

    public static bool operator false(EvilBool b)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
8  
Nice work here. I've passed this along to the C# test and design teams; I'll see if they have any comments on it when I see them tomorrow. –  Eric Lippert Apr 30 '13 at 20:47
3  
This is very strange to me. Why should d be evaluated twice? (I'm not disputing that it clearly is, as you've shown.) I would have expected the evaluated result of true (from the first operator invocation, cause by ||) to be "passed along" to the if statement. That's certainly what would happen if you put a function call in there, for example. –  Dan Tao Apr 30 '13 at 21:23
2  
@DanTao: The expression d is evaluated only once, as you expect. It's the true operator that's being invoked twice, once by || and once by if. –  Quartermeister Apr 30 '13 at 21:59
1  
@DanTao: It might be more clear if we put them on separate statements as var cond = d || M(out y); if (cond) { ... }. First we evaluate d to get an EvilBool object reference. To evaluate the ||, we first invoke EvilBool.true with that reference. That returns true, so we short-circuit and don't invoke M, and then assign the reference to cond. Then, we move on to the if statement. The if statement evaluates its condition by calling EvilBool.true. –  Quartermeister Apr 30 '13 at 21:59
2  
Now this is really cool. I had no idea there is true or false operator. –  IllidanS4 May 4 '13 at 21:49

From MSDN (emphasis mine):

The dynamic type enables the operations in which it occurs to bypass compile-time type checking. Instead, these operations are resolved at run time. The dynamic type simplifies access to COM APIs such as the Office Automation APIs, and also to dynamic APIs such as IronPython libraries, and to the HTML Document Object Model (DOM).

Type dynamic behaves like type object in most circumstances. However, operations that contain expressions of type dynamic are not resolved or type checked by the compiler.

Since the compiler does not type check or resolve any operations that contain expressions of type dynamic, it cannot assure that the variable will be assigned through the use of TryParse().

share|improve this answer
    
If the first condition is met, numberGroups is assigned (in the if true block), if not, the second condition guarantees assignment (via out). –  leppie Apr 30 '13 at 17:36
1  
That is an interesting thought, but the code compiles fine without the myString == null (relying only the TryParse). –  Brandon Martinez Apr 30 '13 at 17:36
1  
@leppie The point is that since the first condition (indeed therefore the entire if expression) involves a dynamic variable, it is not resolved at compile time (the compiler therefore can't make those assumtions). –  NominSim Apr 30 '13 at 17:39
    
@NominSim: I see your point :) +1 Could be a sacrifice from the compiler (breaking C# rules), but other suggestions seems to imply a bug. Eric's snippet shows this is a not a sacrifice, but a bug. –  leppie Apr 30 '13 at 17:44
    
@NominSim This can't be right; just because certain compiler functions are deferred doesn't mean all of them are. There's plenty of evidence to show that under slightly different circumstances, the compiler does the definite assignment analysis without issue, despite the presence of a dynamic expression. –  dlev Apr 30 '13 at 18:02

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