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Ok, this has me absolutely perplexed and worried- As part of a routine, I have been classifying individual observations of variables as TRUE or FALSE based on whether their values are above or below/equal to the median value. However, I have been getting a behavior in R that is largely unexpected from performing this simple test.

So take this set of observations:

data=c(0.6666667, 0.8333, 0.6666667, 0.8333, 0.8333, 0.75, 0.9999, 0.7499667, 0.25, 0.6666667, 0.1667, 0.7499667, 0.5, 0.2500333, 0.3333667, 0.0834, 0.0001, 0.2500333, 0.8333, 0.9999, 0.9999, 0.2500333, 0.2500333, 0.3333667, 0.9166, 0.5, 0.2500333, 0.4166667, 0.0001, 0.1667333, 0.6666333, 0.0834, 0.1667, 0.6666333, 0.9166, 0.1667, 0.7499333, 0.9166, 0.9166, 0.9166, 0.7499667, 0.7499667, 0.4166667, 0.5, 0.2500333, 0.9166, 0.6666667, 0.1667333, 0.25, 0.0001, 0.3333667, 0.0001, 0.25, 0.0834, 0.9999, 0.0834, 0.1667, 0.5, 0.2500333, 0.3333667, 0.9166, 0.9166, 0.8333, 0.9166, 0.75, 0.0834, 0.4166667, 0.5, 0.0001, 0.9999, 0.8333, 0.6666667, 0.9166)

For me to classify these values, I did:

data_med=median(data)
quant_data=data
quant_data[quant_data>data_med]="High"
quant_data[quant_data<=data_med]="Low"

I know there are 1 gazillion ways of doing this more efficiently, but what has me worried is that the output from this does not make sense. Since there are no NaNs on the set and the test is all inclusive (> or <=), I should end up with a list of only TRUE/FALSE values, but instead I get:

[1] "High"  "High"  "High"  "High"  "High"  "High"  "High"  "High"  "Low"   "High"  "Low"   "High"  "Low"   "Low"   "Low"   "Low"   "1e-04"
[18] "Low"   "High"  "High"  "High"  "Low"   "Low"   "Low"   "High"  "Low"   "Low"   "Low"   "1e-04" "Low"   "High"  "Low"   "Low"   "High" 
[35] "High"  "Low"   "High"  "High"  "High"  "High"  "High"  "High"  "Low"   "Low"   "Low"   "High"  "High"  "Low"   "Low"   "1e-04" "Low"  
[52] "1e-04" "Low"   "Low"   "High"  "Low"   "Low"   "Low"   "Low"   "Low"   "High"  "High"  "High"  "High"  "High"  "Low"   "Low"   "Low"  
[69] "1e-04" "High"  "High"  "High"  "High"  

See the "1e-04"s? What is even stranger, let's pick value 69, one of the ones that return odd values:

data[69]
>1e-04

If I test this value alone, I get what I expected to get:

data[69]<=data_med
TRUE

Can someone explain this behavior? It just seems downright dangerous...

share|improve this question
2  
Remove this line: quant_data=data and use data instead of quant_data in the [. < data_med, then try your code. You're assigning High to a numeric vector which replaces it to a character vector. Inspect your current output after assigning High to understand better what's happening. –  Arun Apr 30 '13 at 17:54
2  
A relatively better way to accomplish this task is using ifelse for ex: quant_data <- ifelse(data > data_med, "High", "Low") –  Arun Apr 30 '13 at 17:56
    
Why the down-vote? –  Arun Apr 30 '13 at 17:59
1  
@Lucas, avoid phrases like "Erroneous behavior". It's always better to assume that you are making a mistake and not the language. –  Roland Apr 30 '13 at 18:06
2  
I agree with @Roland that this is the probably the language triggering the down-vote, although the text of the post itself is perfectly reasonable (i.e. it's phrased as "I don't understand what's going on", rather than "R must be doing something wrong/stupid") –  Ben Bolker Apr 30 '13 at 18:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Let's walk through what you did here.

data=c(0.6666667, 0.8333, 0.6666667, 0.8333, 0.8333, 0.75, 0.9999, 0.7499667, 0.25, 0.6666667, 0.1667, 0.7499667, 0.5, 0.2500333, 0.3333667, 0.0834, 0.0001, 0.2500333, 0.8333, 0.9999, 0.9999, 0.2500333, 0.2500333, 0.3333667, 0.9166, 0.5, 0.2500333, 0.4166667, 0.0001, 0.1667333, 0.6666333, 0.0834, 0.1667, 0.6666333, 0.9166, 0.1667, 0.7499333, 0.9166, 0.9166, 0.9166, 0.7499667, 0.7499667, 0.4166667, 0.5, 0.2500333, 0.9166, 0.6666667, 0.1667333, 0.25, 0.0001, 0.3333667, 0.0001, 0.25, 0.0834, 0.9999, 0.0834, 0.1667, 0.5, 0.2500333, 0.3333667, 0.9166, 0.9166, 0.8333, 0.9166, 0.75, 0.0834, 0.4166667, 0.5, 0.0001, 0.9999, 0.8333, 0.6666667, 0.9166)



data_med=median(data)  ## 0.5
quant_data=data        ## irrelevant
quant_data[quant_data>data_med]="High"

But by doing this you have converted quant_data to a character vector:

str(quant_data)
##  chr [1:73] "High" "High" "High" "High" "High" "High" "High" ...

Now the comparison between a character value and the data_med value is almost meaningless, because data_med will get coerced to a character value too:

"High" < "0.5"  ## FALSE
"1e-4" < "0.5"  ## FALSE -- this is your problem.
quant_data[quant_data<=data_med]="Low"

What you presumably meant to do (and a reason to assign quant_data=data) was:

quant_data[data>data_med]="High"
quant_data[data<=data_med]="Low"
table(quant_data)
## High  Low 
##   35   38 

As @Arun points out in comments above, quant_data <- ifelse(data>data_med,"High","Low") would work too. So would an appropriate use of cut().

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, quant_data<=data_med works mostly. "0.1" < 1 gives TRUE, but "1e-4" < 1 gives false. So in the former the character is converted to numeric successfully, but it doesn't work with scientific format. –  Roland Apr 30 '13 at 18:02
1  
It's not converted to numeric, it's just that lexicographic sorting (see my comment above) happens to give you the right answer. –  Ben Bolker Apr 30 '13 at 18:05
    
Ahh, I see. Thanks. –  Roland Apr 30 '13 at 18:07
    
Thanks Ben! I am a former student of your UF ecological models and data course. –  Lucas Fortini Apr 30 '13 at 18:26

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