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I have a list of lists and I am trying to group or cluster them based on their items. A nested list starts a new group if none of the elements are in the previous group.

Input:

paths = [  
        ['D', 'B', 'A', 'H'],  
        ['D', 'B', 'A', 'C'],  
        ['H', 'A', 'C'],  
        ['E', 'G', 'I'],  
        ['F', 'G', 'I']]

My failed Code:

paths = [
    ['D', 'B', 'A', 'H'],
    ['D', 'B', 'A', 'C'],
    ['H', 'A', 'C'],
    ['E', 'G', 'I'],
    ['F', 'G', 'I']
]
groups = []
paths_clone = paths
for path in paths:
    for node in path:
        for path_clone in paths_clone:
            if node in path_clone:
                if not path == path_clone:
                    groups.append([path, path_clone])
                else:
                    groups.append(path)
print groups

Expected Output:

[
 [
  ['D', 'B', 'A', 'H'],
  ['D', 'B', 'A', 'C'],
  ['H', 'A', 'C']
 ],
 [
  ['E', 'G', 'I'],
  ['F', 'G', 'I']
 ]
]

Another Example:

paths = [['shifter', 'barrel', 'barrel shifter'],
         ['ARM', 'barrel', 'barrel shifter'],
         ['IP power', 'IP', 'power'],
         ['ARM', 'barrel', 'shifter']]

Expected Output Groups:

output = [
         [['shifter', 'barrel', 'barrel shifter'],
         ['ARM', 'barrel', 'barrel shifter'],
         ['ARM', 'barrel', 'shifter']],
         [['IP power', 'IP', 'power']],
         ]
share|improve this question
    
What defines a group? And paths_clone is a reference to the same list, not a copy. Use paths[:] to create a copy. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 30 '13 at 17:54
    
@MartijnPieters The group is basically all lists with overlapping items. As shown above, I need a way to cluster lists based on their items that are common with other lists. –  Shankar Apr 30 '13 at 18:02
1  
So a new group starts when there are items in it that have not appeared in the previous group, or in the previous item? –  Martijn Pieters Apr 30 '13 at 18:03
    
@MartijnPieters Yes! Previous group –  Shankar Apr 30 '13 at 18:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are grouping based on sets, so use a set to detect new groups:

def grouper(sequence):
    group, members = [], set()

    for item in sequence:
        if group and members.isdisjoint(item):
            # new group, yield and start new
            yield group
            group, members = [], set()
        group.append(item)
        members.update(item)

    yield group

This gives:

>>> for group in grouper(paths):
...     print group
... 
[['D', 'B', 'A', 'H'], ['D', 'B', 'A', 'C'], ['H', 'A', 'C']]
[['E', 'G', 'I'], ['F', 'G', 'I']]

or you could cast it to a list again:

output = list(grouper(paths))

This assumes that the groups are contiguous. If you have disjoint groups, you need to process the whole list and loop over all groups constructed so far for each item:

def grouper(sequence):
    result = []  # will hold (members, group) tuples

    for item in sequence:
        for members, group in result:
            if members.intersection(item):  # overlap
                members.update(item)
                group.append(item)
                break
        else:  # no group found, add new
            result.append((set(item), [item]))

    return [group for members, group in result]
share|improve this answer
    
@Martjin I am not getting the same output. I am getting 4 groups. Where am I going wrong. [['D', 'B', 'A', 'H']] [['D', 'B', 'A', 'C']] [['H', 'A', 'C'], ['E', 'G', 'I']] [['F', 'G', 'I']] –  Shankar Apr 30 '13 at 18:19
    
@ArunprasathShankar: check that you have the same function, there was an error in there at first (a not where it shouldn't be). –  Martijn Pieters Apr 30 '13 at 18:20
    
@Martjin Hi Martjin it fails for this case. paths = [['shifter', 'barrel', 'barrel shifter'], ['ARM', 'barrel', 'barrel shifter'], ['IP power', 'IP', 'power'], ['ARM', 'barrel', 'shifter']] I get 3 groups instead of two groups :( [['shifter', 'barrel', 'barrel shifter'], ['ARM', 'barrel', 'barrel shifter']] [['IP power', 'IP', 'power']] [['ARM', 'barrel', 'shifter']] –  Shankar Apr 30 '13 at 19:16
    
@ArunprasathShankar: That is because you didn't specify you had disjoint groups. That requires using a dictionary to create all groups in memory first. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 30 '13 at 19:18
    
@Martjin Pieters Can you give some insight on how would I accomplish this! –  Shankar Apr 30 '13 at 19:26

As with most questions in Python that start with "I'm trying to group… by foo…", the answer is "Use itertools.groupby with foo as a key."


First, let's take a very simple grouping criterion: length of each list. For that, the key function is just len. (You may also want to sort first, probably with the same key, depending on your data.)

groups = [list(group) for key, group in itertools.groupby(paths, len)]

Sometimes defining the grouping criterion (and therefore key function) is hard, or impossible, to define in terms of an independent transformation on each element. In those cases, groupby is generally not the answer (although groupby plus another itertools function still might be).

In this case, the most natural way to define the grouping criterion is by comparison with adjacent elements. The easiest way to write that is to write a cmp function that compares two adjacent elements, and then use functools.cmp_to_key on it:

def cmp_paths(lhs, rhs):
    return 0 if any(key in lhs for key in rhs) else -1
key_paths = functools.cmp_to_key(cmp_paths)
groups = [list(group) for key, group in itertools.groupby(paths, key_paths)]
share|improve this answer
1  
defaultdict(list) is the other alternative for grouping things (where foo is the key). The advantage there is that the grouping is done in O(N) operations regardless of whether the input is sorted or not. (but it does require that the key be hashable). –  mgilson Apr 30 '13 at 17:59
    
@abamert I am not trying to group the lists based on their lengths. I want to group them based on overlapping items across the lists as shown in the example above. –  Shankar Apr 30 '13 at 18:00
2  
@ArunprasathShankar: What does "based on their items" mean? What is the actual rule that says whether or not two elements appear in the same group? You need to explain that in a way that human beings can understand before anyone can explain it in a way that Python can understand. –  abarnert Apr 30 '13 at 18:00
    
@abarnert Sorry for the vagueness. Rectified the comment. Please check it –  Shankar Apr 30 '13 at 18:04
    
I'm still not sure I understand the criterion… but it sounds like maybe you can write a cmp function for this pretty easily, and then use cmp_to_key to convert it to a key. So let me edit the answer. –  abarnert Apr 30 '13 at 18:25

Just use any of the existing clustering algorithms. Say K-Means or Hierarchical?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K-means_clustering

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hierarchical_clustering

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