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If I have this code

struct Unit{
    int coef; //coefficient
    int exp;  //exponent
};

class Func: private std::list<Unit>{
    public:
        Func();
        friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream &, Func);
};

How do I print it out? I tried using the concept from here: http://www.cplusplus.com/forum/beginner/5074/ But without success:

ostream& operator<<(ostream &output, Func &pol)
{
    list<Unit>::iterator i;

    for( i = pol.begin(); i != pol.end(); ++i)
    {
        Unit test = *i;

        output << test.coef << " ";
    }

    return output;
}

And do I initialize it correctly?

Func::Func()
{
    Unit test;
    test.coef = 0;
    test.exp = 0;
    Func::push_back(test);
}

Sorry. New to this about inheritance. Though it wasn't hard when it was about the classes I made myself.

Updated code:

struct Unit{
    int coef; //coefficient
    int exp;  //exponent
    Unit():coef(0),exp(0){}
};

class Func : public std::list<Unit>{
    public:
        Func();
        friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream &, const Func &);
};

Func::Func()
{
    Unit test;
    Func::push_back(test);
}

ostream& operator <<(std::ostream &output, const Func& pol)
{
    for (list<Unit>::const_iterator i =  pol.begin(); i != pol.end(); output << i->coef << " " << i->exp << " ", ++i);

    return output;
}
share|improve this question
2  
Why are you using inheritance here? Don’t, just use a private member variable representing the list. Also, show us your (minimal!!!) code, otherwise we cannot really help you. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 30 '13 at 18:01
    
Show what you have. It's probably a better starting point than nothing at all. –  n.m. Apr 30 '13 at 18:05
    
Alright. Updated it. –  user2180833 Apr 30 '13 at 18:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First, regarding your printing. You can do it a number of ways, the most robust being defining free operators for each type. Such as:

struct Unit{
    int coef; //coefficient
    int exp;  //exponent
};

std::ostream& operator <<(std::ostream& os, const Unit& unit)
{
    os << unit.coef << "X^" << unit.exp;
    return os;
}

The function is a little more complex. You would be better served to use the list as a member variable and provide an operator for stream insertion for that class. Such as:

#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <list>
#include <cstdlib>

struct Unit
{
    int coef; //coefficient
    int exp;  //exponent

    Unit(int coef, int exp=0)
        : coef(coef), exp(exp)
    {}

    friend std::ostream& operator <<(std::ostream&, const Unit&);
};

std::ostream& operator <<(std::ostream& os, const Unit& unit)
{
    os << unit.coef << "X^" << unit.exp;
    return os;
}

class Func
{
public:
    std::list<Unit> units;

    friend std::ostream& operator <<(std::ostream&, const Func&);
};

std::ostream& operator <<(std::ostream& os, const Func& func)
{
    std::copy(func.units.begin(), func.units.end(),
              std::ostream_iterator<Unit>(os, " "));
    return os;
}

int main()
{
    Func func;
    func.units.push_back(Unit(3, 2));
    func.units.push_back(Unit(2, 1));
    func.units.push_back(Unit(1, 0));
    std::cout << func << endl;
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Output

3X^2 2X^1 1X^0 

Note: I did NOT properly hide members, provide accessors, etc. That I leave to you, but the general idea on how to provide output-stream operators should be obvious. You could significantly further enhance the output operator for a `Unit by:

  • Not printing exponents of 1
  • Only printing the coefficient for exponents of 0 (no X),
  • Not printing a 1 coefficient of any term with an exponent greater than 0
  • Not printing anything for terms with 0 coefficients.

These tasks I leave to you.

share|improve this answer
    
Great. It all works now. Will write the code as an update of the questions. Wished though I could thank both u and Felix, since I derived from both of urs. –  user2180833 Apr 30 '13 at 19:11

It is not clear for me what do you want to do. Is is a requirement that you inherit from an STL list? I wouldn't do it.

But this at least would be a solution.

struct Unit{
    int coef; //coefficient
    int exp;  //exponent
};

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream &os, Unit const& v)
{
  os << v.coef << " " << v.exp << std::endl;
  return os;
}

int main()
{
  std::list<Unit> myList;
  Unit element;
  element.coef = 0;
  element.exp = 0;
  myList.push_back(element);

  std::ostringstream os;
  for (std::list<Unit>::const_iterator it = myList.begin(); it != myList.end(); ++it)
  {
    os << *it;
  }
  std::cout << os.str() << std::endl;
}

With C++11 this could be implemented much nicer, but I don't know what compiler you are using. I did not compile it so far, just hacked it down; so sorry for syntax errors.

share|improve this answer
    
Hei Felix Thank you. But unfortunately I have to use the STL list inherited in a class. Have to use it for my hw as in multiplying, addition, subtractions etc. I wouldn't do it that way as well, but we have to do it this way to learn/understand the concept. –  user2180833 Apr 30 '13 at 18:19

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