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Here is a brief snippet example (which you can paste in your Linux terminal), creating a new git repository and adding some files to it (using git version 1.7.9.5):

cd /tmp/
mkdir myrepo_git
cd myrepo_git/
git init
git config user.name "Your Name"
git config user.email you@example.com
echo "test" > file_tracked_unchanged.txt
echo "test" > file_tracked_changed.txt
echo "test" > file_untracked.txt
git add file_tracked_unchanged.txt 
git add file_tracked_changed.txt
git commit -m "initial commit"

Now, after the initial commit, I want to change the file_tracked_changed.txt files, and keep the others (here, only file_tracked_unchanged.txt) unchanged for the next commit. Below is a snippet which demonstrates that, and the diverse outputs of git status vs git ls-files (git shell output is prefixed with #):

echo "test more" >> file_tracked_changed.txt

git status -uno
# # On branch master
# # Changes not staged for commit:
# #   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
# #   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
# #
# # modified:   file_tracked_changed.txt
# #
# no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")
git status
# # On branch master
# # Changes not staged for commit:
# #   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
# #   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
# #
# # modified:   file_tracked_changed.txt
# #
# # Untracked files:
# #   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
# #
# # file_untracked.txt
# no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")
git status -uno --short
#  M file_tracked_changed.txt
git status --short
#  M file_tracked_changed.txt
# ?? file_untracked.txt
git ls-files -v
# H file_tracked_changed.txt
# H file_tracked_unchanged.txt

git add file_tracked_changed.txt

git status -uno
# # On branch master
# # Changes to be committed:
# #   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
# #
# # modified:   file_tracked_changed.txt
# #
# # Untracked files not listed (use -u option to show untracked files)
git status
# # On branch master
# # Changes to be committed:
# #   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
# #
# # modified:   file_tracked_changed.txt
# #
# # Untracked files:
# #   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
# #
# # file_untracked.txt
git status -uno --short
# M  file_tracked_changed.txt
git status --short
# M  file_tracked_changed.txt
# ?? file_untracked.txt
git ls-files -v
# H file_tracked_changed.txt
# H file_tracked_unchanged.txt

What I'm looking for, is a command which will show all tracked files in a directory (which git ls-files -v does), with their accurate repository status (which git ls-files doesn't show, as it shows H as status for all tracked files). For instance, I'd like to obtain something like the pseudocode:

git status-tracked
# M file_tracked_changed.txt
# . file_tracked_unchanged.txt

... where the dot . would a symbol indicating a tracked, but unchanged file (if I recall correctly, SVN may use a U character for these).

Ultimately, I'd like to also show the status of all files in a directory, as in the pseudocode:

git status-tracked-and-untracked
# M file_tracked_changed.txt
# . file_tracked_unchanged.txt
# ?? file_untracked.txt

... but it's more important to me to get to the status of all tracked files, as in the pseudo git status-tracked above.

Any command in git, that already does something like this?

share|improve this question
    
Try git status -sb –  Kartik Apr 30 '13 at 19:05
1  
Many thanks for the comment @Kartik - but that command shows tracked modified + untracked; I'm looking for a command that shows tracked modified + tracked unmodified. Cheers! –  sdaau Apr 30 '13 at 19:15

4 Answers 4

Thanks @sdaau. I've made a few changes so that it runs much faster, and delivers results in the same format as git status:

git ls-files | while read -r line;
do
    st=$(git status -s "$line");
    if [ -n "$st" ]; then
        echo "$st";
    else
        echo "   $line";
    fi;
done
share|improve this answer
    
^ Very useful, but still somewhat slow, because it runs a git_status for every single file. –  frnhr Jul 4 at 12:15

Thanks to @Andomar, for the git ls-tree tip; this is what it shows:

git ls-tree --name-status HEAD
# file_tracked_changed.txt
# file_tracked_unchanged.txt

... but I want statuses :)

 

OK, here is a solution, calling both ls-files and status, and interleaving them with a bit of bash parsing:

git ls-files -cdmoskt --abbrev=8 | while read -r line; do \
  fn=$(echo "$line" | sed 's/.*\s\(\w\+\)/\1/'); \
  st=$(git status -s "$fn" | printf "%-02s " $(sed 's/\([[:print:]]\+\)\s.*/\1/')); \
  echo "$st- $line"; \
done

If you run this as in the OP example, you get:

git ls-files -cdmoskt --abbrev=8 | while read -r line; do fn=$(echo "$line" | sed 's/.*\s\(\w\+\)/\1/'); st=$(git status -s "$fn" | printf "%-02s " $(sed 's/\([[:print:]]\+\)\s.*/\1/')); echo "$st- $line"; done
# ?? - ? file_untracked.txt
# M  - H 100644 52e7a08e 0  file_tracked_changed.txt
#    - H 100644 9daeafb9 0  file_tracked_unchanged.txt

... which is basically what I wanted. (I'll post back here if I have luck in converting this into a git alias).


EDIT: here as git alias (for ~/.gitconfig):

  ls-fstatus = "! cd $PWD/$GIT_PREFIX; git ls-files -cdmoskt --abbrev=8 | while read -r line; do \
    fn=$(echo \"$line\" | sed \"s/.*\\s\\([[:print:]]\\+\\)/\\1/\"); \
    st=$(git status -s "$fn" | printf \"%-02s \" $(sed \"s/\\([[:print:]]\\+\\)\\s.*/\\1/\")); \
    echo \"$st- $line\"; \
  done "

... so one can just call git ls-fstatus in a given git repo subdirectory.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't handle paths with spaces. By added quotes around the argument to cd it works: cd \"$PWD/$GIT_PREFIX\"; –  KeithB Mar 27 at 14:48
git status -s | egrep -v '^\?\?'

This filters out lines that start with ??, that is, the untracked files.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the answer, @Andomar - but unfortunately, that command doesn't show the tracked but unmodified files, which is what I am asking. Cheers! –  sdaau Apr 30 '13 at 19:13
1  
git ls-tree --name-status HEAD should do what you want, but it silently ignores the -status part :) –  Andomar Apr 30 '13 at 19:28
    
Many thanks, @Andomar - great tip, I had no idea about ls-tree, but as you say, the statuses are not shown - so I just posted an answer which "interleaves" the statuses from gits status and ls-files. Cheers! –  sdaau Apr 30 '13 at 20:12

Inspired by @RogerDueck's answer, I made a script that executes git ls-files and git status only once each. It runs about 15 times faster on my repo with ~ 1700 files, just under 2 sec.

EDIT: Added a number of fixes and some unittests, moved to GitHub: https://github.com/frnhr/git-fullstatus

Sample output:

 M some/file
D  another/file
 D more/files/blahblah
A  this/is/an/added/file/i/think
   an/unchanged_file
   another/unchanged_file
share|improve this answer

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