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I need to run an algorithm with worst-case runtime Θ(n^2). After that I need to run an algorithm 5 times with a runtime of Θ(n^2) every time it runs.

What is the combined worst-case runtime of these algorithms ?

In my head, the formula will look something like this:

( N^2 + (N^2 * 5) )

But when I've to analyse it in theta notation my guess is that it runs in Θ(n^2) time.

Am I right?

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1  
IIRC it doesn't matter how many times it runs, it would still be N^2 time... But school was a long time ago for me so can someone else confirm that? Also, this might be more of a question for programmers.stackexchange.com though – nullability Apr 30 '13 at 19:33
    
2N^2 is still O(n^2) complexity, however the equation to describe the program would obviously look different. – christopher Apr 30 '13 at 19:34
    
I wasent sure where to put this question but yes, I also believe that it will run N^2 times. – Jungler Apr 30 '13 at 19:35
    
this are homeworks. – mightyuhu Apr 30 '13 at 19:52

Two times O(N^2) is still O(N^2), ten times O(N^2) is still O(N^2), five times O(N^2) is still O(N^2), any times O(N^2) is still O(N^2) as long as 'any' is a constant.

Same answer holds for \Theta instead of O.

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does your answer still hold in theta notation? He doesn't want big-oh – im so confused Apr 30 '13 at 19:37
    
@AK4749 Yes it does – ElKamina Apr 30 '13 at 19:39
    
downvote removed, thanks for the clarification! – im so confused Apr 30 '13 at 19:40
    
Food for thought. If N=200 then N^2 = 40000. You say "any" number times N^2 is the same. But if that number is 200 then you have N^3 – William Falcon Apr 30 '13 at 19:40
3  
@waf It is asymptotic notation. So we are worried about cases when n tends to infinity. – ElKamina Apr 30 '13 at 19:42

It is O(n^2) regardless because what you have is basically O(6n^2), which is still O(n^2) because you can ignore the constant. What you're looking at is something that belongs to a set of functions and not the function itself.

Essentially, 6n^2 ∈ O(n^2).

EDIT

You asked about Θ as well. Θ gives you the lower and upper bound, whereas O gives you the upper bound only. You only get the lower bound with Ω. Θ is the intersection of these two.

Anything that is Θ(f(n)) is also O(f(n)), but not the other way round.

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does your answer still hold in theta notation? He doesn't want big-oh – im so confused Apr 30 '13 at 19:37
    
@AK4749 Good point; I missed his last sentence. – Vivin Paliath Apr 30 '13 at 19:38
    
No worries, I myself only remember Big-Oh so wanted to make sure - i think Theta is strict, so constants do matter? – im so confused Apr 30 '13 at 19:39
1  
@AK4749 IIRC, big theta simply means that the function is between the upper and lower bounds, so it is between both big-o and omega. So anything that is big theta is also big-o, but not the other way round. – Vivin Paliath Apr 30 '13 at 19:41

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