Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say I have a List like this:

List<string> _lstr = new List<string>();

        _lstr.Add("AA");
        _lstr.Add("BB");
        _lstr.Add("1");
        _lstr.Add("7");
        _lstr.Add("2");
        _lstr.Add("5");

How do I sum up the integers in the List if I don't know how many integers are in the List? Could be 4, could be 10, etc... All I know is that the first two items are strings, the rest are integers.

In this case the desired result is 15.

share|improve this question
    
What have you tried? Have you made any attempts to solve this problem yourself? Do you know how to validate if a string can be parsed to an integer? –  Servy Apr 30 '13 at 19:50
add comment

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Method A Unconditionally skips the first 2 and assumes the rest are all integer strings:

var sum = _lstr.Skip(2).Select(int.Parse).Sum();

Method B Makes no assumtions:

var sum = _lstr.Aggregate(0, (x, z) => x + (int.TryParse(z, out x) ? x : 0));
share|improve this answer
add comment

without making the assumption that first two items are strings

int sum = _lstr.Select(s => {int i; return int.TryParse(s,out i) ? i : 0; })
               .Sum();
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the no-assumptions approch. Assumptions are often wrong –  Adrian Carneiro Apr 30 '13 at 19:56
add comment

Very easily:

list.Skip(2).Select(int.Parse).Sum();
share|improve this answer
add comment
var sum = _lstr.Skip(2).Sum(s => int.Parse(s));
share|improve this answer
add comment
 int num = 0; int sum  = 0;
 _lstr.ForEach(x => {Int32.TryParse(x, out num); sum +=num;});

Just to prove the point that if Int32.TryParse fails the out var is resetted to zero

 _lstr.Add("AA");
 _lstr.Add("BB");
 _lstr.Add("1");
 _lstr.Add("7");
 _lstr.Add("2");
 _lstr.Add("5");
 _lstr.Add("CC");
 _lstr.Add("9");

 int num = 0; int sum  = 0;
 foreach(string s in _lstr)
 {
    bool result = Int32.TryParse(s, out num);
    Console.WriteLine("TryParse:" + result + " num=" + num);
 }

TryParse:False num=0
TryParse:False num=0
TryParse:True num=1
TryParse:True num=7
TryParse:True num=2
TryParse:True num=5
TryParse:False num=0
TryParse:True num=9
share|improve this answer
    
but in case of false num=0, try adding another string and another integer after the last integer –  Steve Apr 30 '13 at 19:56
    
Apologies, it's out, so it has to change the value - are you confident that it sets it to 0? I can't find any documentation to that effect. –  VisualMelon Apr 30 '13 at 19:58
    
@Steve I am not the downvoter, but I personally don't like much using Linq with side-effects. –  L.B Apr 30 '13 at 20:00
2  
@L.B Technically it's not even LINQ. There is no LINQ at all in this answer. –  Servy Apr 30 '13 at 20:02
2  
@Servy than a classical for loop would seem better(of course just preference). –  L.B Apr 30 '13 at 20:04
show 2 more comments
int sum=0,i=0;       
foreach(string s in mylist){
    //in case of non integers
    try{
        i=int.parse(s);//you can put convert or tryparse too here
    } catch(Exception ex) {
        i=0;
    }
    sum=sum+i;
}

return sum;
share|improve this answer
    
Because it doesn't work. The OP has a list of strings, not all of which are integers. –  Servy Apr 30 '13 at 20:11
    
have you seen the edited answer before downvoting me –  Alok Apr 30 '13 at 20:12
    
Yep. Still doesn't work. –  Servy Apr 30 '13 at 20:12
    
well i gave the general idea, thats what we get on forums generally anyways i guess OP has his problem solved by now. –  Alok Apr 30 '13 at 20:15
    
Exceptions should be used to handle exceptions not workflows. –  L.B Apr 30 '13 at 20:27
show 4 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.