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I have made a Windows Service that reads messages from the MSMQueue and I need to do that in parallel (two threads should read messages simultaneously). How can I do that? Here is my code (pretty much by the book):

public partial class MyNewService : ServiceBase
    {
        System.Messaging.MessageQueue mq;
        System.Messaging.Message mes;

        public MyNewService()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            if (MessageQueue.Exists("MyServer\\MyQueue"))
                mq = new System.Messaging.MessageQueue("MyServer\\MyQueue");

            mq.ReceiveCompleted += new ReceiveCompletedEventHandler(MyReceiveCompleted);
            mq.BeginReceive();

        }

        private static void MyReceiveCompleted(Object source, ReceiveCompletedEventArgs asyncResult)
        {
           try
           {
                MessageQueue mq = (MessageQueue)source;
                Message m = mq.EndReceive(asyncResult.AsyncResult);

                // TODO: Process the m message here

                // Restart the asynchronous receive operation.
                mq.BeginReceive();
            }
            catch(MessageQueueException)
            {
             // Handle sources of MessageQueueException.
            }

            return; 
         }

}

And this is my Main function:

static class Program
  {
    static void Main()
    {
      ServiceBase[] ServicesToRun;
      ServicesToRun = new ServiceBase[] 
            { 
                new MyNewService() 
            };
      ServiceBase.Run(ServicesToRun);
    }
  }
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2  
What's the problem or question? –  D Stanley Apr 30 '13 at 20:05
2  
It seems to me that something like picking messages out of a queue will not benefit from parallelization. Are you sure it isn't really the workload incurred by processing the message that you want to parallelize? –  spender Apr 30 '13 at 20:08
    
This is the hole story: I have made MSMQ reader as Console Application. When I send 1000 messages in Queue, one instance of that reader processes them in about 15 minutes. When I start two instances of that Console Application, they are finished in 8 min. Now, I have Windows Service (code above) with same reader (takes 15 min to process). How can I make two instances of that reader in code, so that they read messages faster (must be in code)?? –  Juzgj Hjtzuzt May 1 '13 at 12:40
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2 Answers

Is there a reason you can't just do the processing on multiple threads instead of dequeue on multiple threads?

Here is a very basic implementation - it uses the ThreadPool to queue items, but you are then relying on the queue of the ThreadPool to handle the number of threads and the number of work items. That might not be ideal for your situation depending on lots of other factors.

Also, heed the Remarks section about SetMaxThreads here.

private static void MyReceiveCompleted(Object source, ReceiveCompletedEventArgs asyncResult)
{
   try
   {
       MessageQueue mq = (MessageQueue)source;
       Message m = mq.EndReceive(asyncResult.AsyncResult);

       // TODO: Process each message on a separate thread
       // This will immediately queue all items on the threadpool,
       // so there may be more threads spawned than you really want
       // Change how many items are allowed to process concurrently using ThreadPool.SetMaxThreads()
       System.Threading.ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(new WaitCallback(doWork), m);


       // Restart the asynchronous receive operation.
       mq.BeginReceive();
   }
   catch(MessageQueueException)
   {
       // Handle sources of MessageQueueException.
   }

   return; 
}

private static void doWork(object message)
{
    // TODO: Actual implementation here.
}
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Just host more than one instance of the reader in more than one windows service. That way you can increase throughput by hosting more instances, or throttle by going single threaded. It's much simpler than trying to do it all in code.

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