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I have a new problem here. I'm still learning C for PIC (xc8 compiler) and as a beginner project i'm doing a thermometer with the popular ds18b20 and a pic16f628 i had lying around. My program does behave good when it is allowed to run but while i was playing with pointers, structures, arrays etc. to return more than one value in a function i noticed something went haywire and now the PC goes back and forth not allowing the program to run sequentially, at least that's what i see if I use the simulator in mplabx. I'm quite sure I have forgot something about program and/or memory locations but i can't figure out what or why. Can someone help me? I paste here the main code, what else do you need?

/*
 * File:   termometro.c
 * Author: zakkos 
 * Created on April 18, 2013, 2:20 PM
 *
 * /
/*ESSENTIAL DEFINITIONS*/
#define _XTAL_FREQ 4000000
/*INCLUSIONS*/
#include <xc.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <lcd.h>
#include <1-wire.h>
/*CONFIG PRAGMA*/
#pragma config BOREN = OFF, CPD = OFF, FOSC = INTOSCIO, MCLRE = OFF, WDTE = OFF, CP = OFF, LVP = OFF, PWRTE = ON

//typedef unsigned char uint8_t;

void read_temp(void);

union {
    char eratura;
    char decimali;
}temps;

int main(void) {

    INTCON = 0x00;
    PIE1 = 0x00;

    CMCON = 0x07; //disabilito i comparatori - disable comparators

    TRISA = 0x00;
    PORTA = 0x00;

    TRISB = 0x00;
    PORTB = 0x00;

    const char decims[16] = {0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 3, 4, 5, 5, 6, 6, 7, 8, 8, 9};
    char temp;

    lcd_init();
    lcd_send_cmd(LCD_CLR);
    lcd_send_cmd(LCD_HOME);
    writeString("Hello,");
    lcd_send_cmd(LCD_LN2);
    writeString("World!");
    __delay_ms(1000);
    while(1)
    {
        read_temp();
        lcd_send_cmd(LCD_CLR);
        lcd_send_cmd(LCD_HOME);
        writeString("Temp:");
        lcd_send_cmd(LCD_LN2);
        if((temps.eratura & 0x80)){                             //if sign bit is set
                temps.eratura = ~temps.eratura;                 //2's complement
                temps.eratura += 1;                             
                temps.decimali = ~temps.decimali;               //2's complement
                temps.decimali += 1;
                lcd_send_dat(0x2D);                             //minus
        }
        temp = (temps.eratura/100)& 0x0F;                       //centinaia 157/100=1 (hundreds)
        if(temp){
            lcd_send_dat(0x30 | temp);
            temp = ((temps.eratura/10)%10) & 0x0F;              //decine    157/10=15%10=5 (tens if hundreds is set, meaning it will display also a 0)
            lcd_send_dat(0x30 | temp);
        } else {
            temp = ((temps.eratura/10)%10) & 0x0F;              //decine    157/10=15%10=5 (tens if hundreds is no set, meaning it will not display if 0)
            if(temp){lcd_send_dat(0x30 | temp);
            }
        }
        lcd_send_dat(0x30 | (temps.eratura%10)& 0x0F);          //unita     157%10=7 (ones)
        lcd_send_dat(0x2E);                                     //dot
        lcd_send_dat(0x30 | decims[temps.decimali] & 0x0F);     //decimals
        lcd_send_dat(0xDF);                                     //degrees
 }
}

void read_temp(void){
    char scratchpad[9];
    while(ow_reset());
    ow_write_byte(0xCC);
    ow_write_byte(0x44);
    while(ow_read_bit()==0);
    __delay_ms(1);
    while(ow_reset());
    ow_write_byte(0xCC);
    ow_write_byte(0xBE);
    for(char k=0;k<10;k++){
        scratchpad[k] = ow_read_byte();
    }
    temps.decimali = scratchpad[0] & 0x0F;
    temps.eratura = (scratchpad[1] << 4)|(scratchpad[0] >> 4);
    return;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Not sure if stackoverflow is the best place for you to post. You might have more chance here: electronics.stackexchange.com –  Joce Apr 30 '13 at 20:45
    
Thanks, i'll give it a try! –  zakkos Apr 30 '13 at 20:50
    
Also try microchip.com/forums although there are some promising answers here. –  Peter L. Apr 30 '13 at 20:55
    
Thanks, I'll ask there too –  zakkos Apr 30 '13 at 21:09

4 Answers 4

for(char k=0;k<10;k++){
    scratchpad[k] = ow_read_byte();
}

...will run from 0-9 (10 characters) while...

char scratchpad[9];

...only reserves space for 9. This may overwrite the stack (ie the return address)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Didn't noticed that, i'll correct it immediately. But unfortunately the program worked well before I tried using "struct" (and then "union" to see if it changed things) to pass values from read_temp(); to main(); I don't even know if i did it right and if it's the best way to do it, it's only to learn how things work! –  zakkos Apr 30 '13 at 20:56

This:

        temps.eratura = ~temps.eratura;                 //2's complement
        temps.eratura += 1;                             
        temps.decimali = ~temps.decimali;               //2's complement
        temps.decimali += 1;

is a big nop as temps is a union and not a struct. What are you trying to do here? Why not:

temps.eratura = -temps.eratura;

Perhaps you meant for the second member of the union to be an int? In that case, it still fails, but makes a bit more sense in its use in read_temp

And you are accessing 10 chars for a 9 char array as others have mentioned.

More Info based on comments:

You definately want to use a struct for your temps as you want 2 distict values in memory. Also, while I'm not sure what your compiler allows,

    if(temps.eratura < 0){              
            temps.eratura = -temps.eratura;
            temps.decimali = -temps.decimali;
            lcd_send_dat('-'); 
    }

Seems a bit for straight forward - allowing the compiler to handle the 2s compliment for you.

next:

temp = (temps.eratura/100)& 0x0F;

has very little space to work as the value can only go up to 128. This is basically setting temp to 0 if temps.eratura is less than 100 and 1 if greater. No need for the & here. Ah, you are sending digits. Ok.

temp = temps.eratura;

if(temp >= 100)
{
    temp -= 100;  
    lcd_send_dat('1');
}

if(temps.eratura >= 10)
{
    lcd_send_dat('0' + (temp / 10));
}

lcd_send_dat('0' + (temp % 10));

Then for your decimal:

const char decims[16] =
   {'0', '0', '1', '1', '2', '3', '3', '4', '5', '5', '6', '6', '7', '8', '8', '9'};

and

lcd_send_dat('.');  
lcd_send_dat(decims[temps.decimali]); 
lcd_send_dat(0xDF);  

or we can get rid of the decims converter completely with:

lcd_send_dat('0' + ((temps.decimali * 10) / 16)); 

Basically, all these changes are allowing the compiler to do a little work for you and making the code easier to follow.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried a "struct" before using "union" but i got the same problem. The code there should do a 2's complement of both members of temps (a 1's complement plus one), both 8 bits long. Before adding the decimals (that's why i need to pass 2 values outside read_temp(); one for the whole temperature and one for the digits after the dot) it worked well, the values it gets from the sensor are evaluated correctly, then i added the "struct" and everything went wrong... –  zakkos Apr 30 '13 at 21:06
2  
A union means that both members occupy the same memory location. I'm sure that's not what you want. Since changing it from a struct to a union didn't help anyway, I suggest changing it back to a struct and proceeding from there. –  Keith Thompson Apr 30 '13 at 21:13
    
In the same way, those two lines don't make sense with your union, you are assigning it and immediately replacing the content on the next line: temps.decimali = scratchpad[0] & 0x0F; temps.eratura = (scratchpad[1] << 4)|(scratchpad[0] >> 4); –  Étienne Apr 30 '13 at 21:16
    
thanks for the insight keith, i thought a 'union' meant a different thing (the two members were placed in sequential addresses in the same memory block, the same page in the pic memory structure), I change the code as you suggest. Sorry etienne but i don't understand what you mean, I give 'temps.decimali' and 'temps.eratura' two different values. Of course that's what i THOUGHT I did before knowing how a 'union' works! –  zakkos Apr 30 '13 at 21:43
    
Thanks michael! I'm still thinking a lot in assembler so i have a hard time allowing the compiler to do work for me (as strange as this may sound!) now i feel i bit stupid about the 2's complement thing, it was so obvious since i'm dealing with signed numbers! –  zakkos Apr 30 '13 at 21:55

On the microchip forum they spotted a flaw in the code. Turns out the problem was me, I didn't account for a negative index in the decims[]; array when it was evaluated in the case of a negative temperature

if(temps.eratura < 0){ 
 temps.eratura = -temps.eratura; 
 temps.decimali = -temps.decimali; 
 lcd_send_dat('-'); 
 } 

then used in

lcd_send_dat(decims[temps.decimali]); //decimals

the 2's complement of a byte containing only the lower nibble (0x0F) has the most significant nibble set (0xF1). This was the source of all my problems! Adding a mask on the lower nibble after complementing the byte solved the problem:

if(temps.eratura < 0){ 
 temps.eratura = -temps.eratura; 
 temps.decimali = -temps.decimali & 0x0F; 
 lcd_send_dat('-'); 
 } 

Thank you all for the answers, you really helped me a lot in understanding how things work!

share|improve this answer

It could be the C compiler optimizing the code, has can give the appearance of non-linear code execution... Try single stepping with the optimizer turned off.

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