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I would like to implement a map-like function which preserves the type of input sequence. map does not preserve it:

map(str, (8, 9))  # input is a tuple
=> ['8', '9']     # output is a list

One way I came up with is this:

def map2(f, seq):
   return type(seq)( f(x) for x in seq )

map2(str, (1,2))
=> ('1', '2')
map2(str, [3,4])
=> ['3', '4']
map2(str, deque([5,6]))
=> deque(['5', '6'])

However, this does not work if seq is an iterator/generator. imap works in this case.

So my questions are:

  1. Is there a better way to implement map2, which supports list, tuple, and many others?
  2. Is there an elegant way to extend map2 to also support generators (like imap does)? Clearly, I'd like to avoid: try: return map2(...) except TypeError: return imap(...)

The reason I'm looking for something like that is that I'm writing a function-decorator which converts the return value, from type X to Y. If the original function returns a sequence (let's assume a sequence can only be a list, a tuple, or a generator), I assume it is a sequence of X's, and I want to convert it to the corresponding sequence of Y's (while preserving the type of the sequence).

As you probably realize, I'm using python 2.7, but python 3 is also of interest.

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1  
Your formalism also doesn't work for map(str,'12') ;-) –  mgilson Apr 30 '13 at 20:48
1  
This doesn't sound like duck typing –  jamylak Apr 30 '13 at 20:55
    
Python defines what sequence means (see also ABCs). Nowhere does it guarantee that a sequence can be constructed from an iterable. Meanwhile, a generator is not a sequence, and it's also not a useful type. So, the only possibility will be something ad-hoc and clunky. –  abarnert Apr 30 '13 at 21:04
    
@abarnert and jamylak, I agree with you both. so let's take a step back -- how would you write a decorator which converts the return value? clearly changing the the semantics from tuple/generator to a list is not a good idea. –  shx2 Apr 30 '13 at 21:07
    
Why would a decorator be any better than a new function? It's still going to have to make the same assumptions, use the same ad-hoc and clunky rules, and violate the spirit of Python in the same ways. The only advantage is if you want to apply the same clunky rules to lots of functions (imap, ifilter, ifilterfalse, etc.); if that's what you're asking, I can write an answer that shows it. –  abarnert Apr 30 '13 at 21:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, type(seq)( f(x) for x in seq ) is really just type(seq)(imap(f, seq)). Why not just use that?

Second, what you're trying to do doesn't make sense in general. map takes any iterable, not just a sequence. The difference is, basically, that a sequence has a len and is randomly-accessible.

There is no rule that an iterable of type X can be constructed from values of type Y by calling type(X)(y_iter). In fact, while it's generally true for sequences, there are very few other examples for which it is true.

If what you want is to handle a few special types specially, you can do that:

def map2(f, seq):
    it = imap(f, seq)
    if isinstance(seq, (tuple, list)):
        return type(seq)(it)
    else:
        return it

Or, if you want to assume that all sequences can be constructed this way (which is true for most built-in sequences, but consider, e.g. xrange—which wasn't designed as a sequence but does meet the protocol—and of course there are no guarantees beyond what's built in):

def map2(f, seq):
    it = imap(f, seq)
    try:
        len(seq)
    except:
        return it
    else:
        return type(seq)(it)

You could assume that any iterable type that can be constructed from an iterable is a sequence (as you suggested in your question)… but this is likely to lead to more false positives than benefits, so I wouldn't. Again, remember that len is part of the definition of being a sequence, while "constructible from an iterator" is not, and there are perfectly reasonable iterable types that will do something completely different when given an iterator.

Whatever you do is going to be a hack, because the very intention is a hack, and goes against the explicit design wishes of the Python developers. The whole point of the iterator/iterable protocol is that you should care about the type of the iterable as rarely as possible. That's why Python 3.x has gone further and replaced the list-based functions like map and filter with iterator-based functions instead.


So, how do we turn one of these transformations into a decorator?

Well, first, let's skip the decorator bit and just write a higher-order function that takes an imap-like function and returns an equivalent function with this transformation applied to it:

def sequify(func):
    def wrapped(f, seq):
        it = func(f, seq)
        try:
            len(seq)
        except:
            return it
        else:
            return type(seq)(it)
    return wrapped

So:

>>> seqmap = sequify(itertools.imap)
>>> seqmap(int, (1.2, 2.3))
(1, 2)
>>> sequify(itertools.ifilter)(lambda x: x>0, (-2, -1, 0, 1, 2))
(1, 2)

Now, how do we turn that into a decorator? Well, a function that returns a function already is a decorator. You probably want to add in functools.wraps (although you may want that even in the non-decorator case), but that's the only change. For example, I can write a generator that acts like imap, or a function that returns an iterator, and automatically transform either into a seqmap-like function:

@sequify
def map_and_discard_none(func, it):
    for elem in imap(func, it):
        if elem is not None:
            yield elem

Now:

>>> map_and_discard_none(lambda x: x*2 if x else x, (1, 2, None))
(2, 4)

This, of course, only works for functions with map-like syntax—that is, they take a function and an iterable. (Well, it will accidentally work for functions that take various kinds of wrong types—e.g., you can call sequify(itertools.count(10, 5)) and it will successfully detect that 5 isn't a sequence and therefore just pass the iterator back untouched.) To make it more general, you could do something like:

def sequify(func, type_arg=1):
    def wrapped(*args, **kwargs):
        it = func(f, seq)
        try:
            len(args[type_arg])
        except:
            return it
        else:
            return type(seq)(it)
    return wrapped

And now, you can go crazy with sequify(itertools.combinations, 0) or whatever you prefer. In this case, to make it a useful decorator, you probably want to go a step further:

def sequify(type_arg=1):
    def wrapper(func):
        def wrapped(*args, **kwargs):
            it = func(f, seq)
            try:
                len(args[type_arg])
            except:
                return it
            else:
                return type(seq)(it)
        return wrapped
    return wrapper

So you can do this:

@sequify(3)
def my_silly_function(pred, defval, extrastuff, main_iterable, other_iterable):
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. you answered a vast super-set of my question ;) –  shx2 May 1 '13 at 5:12
    
type(seq)(f(x) for x in seq) is not really just type(imap(f, seq)). I believe you mean type(seq)(imap(f, seq))) and even this is not the exact same, those two lines of code emit very different opcodes (imap function call is different than evaluating the generator expression inline). –  marr75 May 2 '13 at 19:43
    
@marr75: For the first part, yes, thanks for catching that typo. For the second… of course they're not the exact same. Just as list(imap(…)) is not the exact same as either map(…) or a list comprehension. The basic effect is the same. The most important difference is to a human reader, who will immediately see that this is "a map-like function" when it's a wrapper around a map-like function than a genexp that works out to have the same effect. There are also differences under the covers, but when they matter, I think imap will be closer to the OP's desire for "map-like". –  abarnert May 2 '13 at 20:10
    
No disagreement on your intent. I just like to bring up as often as possible python function call overhead and opcodes so that we can get the community to embrace PyPy as the primary implementation. :) –  marr75 May 4 '13 at 19:48
1  
@marr75: Well, not until after py3k support is done. CPython will always be the primary 2.7 implementation, because the only reason to stay with 2.7 is inertia. Once PyPy is up to date, the only reason not to make it the primary implementation will be that it's so easy to extend the language that CPython, Jython, and Iron can't possibly keep up. :) –  abarnert May 6 '13 at 17:51

Your question boils down to: Given a sequence (by which you seem to mean any python object which supports iteration, not the same sequence python docs lay down) and a transformation, is there a general way to apply the transformation to each element and create a new sequence of the exact same type?

The answer is no. There is no guarantee that the iterable type will support creating a new instance from an iterable. Some objects support this inherently in their constructors; some do not. An iterable type makes no guarantees about supporting the opposite operation. You would need to special case all types you were aware of that would not work with the simple iterable as an argument to the initialization case.

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Your formalism also doesn't work for map(str,'12') either.

Ultimately, you don't know what arguments the type of the iterable will actually take in the constructor/initializer, so there's no way to do this in general. Also note that imap doesn't give you the same type as a generator:

>>> type(x for x in range(10))
<type 'generator'>
>>> type(imap(str,range(10)))
<type 'itertools.imap'>
>>> isinstance((x for x in range(10)),type(imap(str,range(10))))
False

You might be thinking to yourself "surely with python's introspection, I could inspect the arguments to the initializer" -- And you'd be right! However, even if you know how many arguments go to the initializer, and what their names are, you still can't get any information on what you're actually supposed to pass to them. I suppose you could write some sort of machine learning algorithm to figure it out from the docstrings ... but I think that's well beyond the scope of this question (and it assumes the author was behaving nicely and creating good docstrings to begin with).

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Good points. But I'm not looking for something which works in general. I'd be happy with something which only converts list->list, tuple->tuple, iterator/generator-like -> iterator/generator-like (does not have to be the exact same type). –  shx2 Apr 30 '13 at 20:56
    
Yes, introspection and machine learning is way beyond the scope of this question :) –  shx2 Apr 30 '13 at 20:57
    
Then I think try/except is your best bet inside your function. Is there a reason you explicitly want to avoid it? Alternatively you could use a bunch of isinstances to catch all the cases you want but it's not going to be pretty. –  mgilson Apr 30 '13 at 20:59
    
not at all. I just hoped to learn a new python trick. My feeling was there was a simple solution to the problem and I was missing it. –  shx2 Apr 30 '13 at 21:01
3  
@shx2 -- I think that there probably isn't an easy way to do this because in python we like duck-typing. It doesn't matter what type you have as long as it tastes like a duck when you roast it. It's up to the caller to convert it to a different type when it tastes funny to them. –  mgilson Apr 30 '13 at 21:05

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