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I got the following code in C++ :

in main():

#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
cout << function(1) << endl;

return 0;
}

in my source code file:

#include <math.h>

int function(int number)
{
int value(number + 2);

return value;
}

And in my header called "math.h" :

#ifndef MATH_H_INCLUDED
#define MATH_H_INCLUDED

int function(int number);

#endif // MATH_H_INCLUDED

When I try to compile it I got the error : "function" was not declared in this scope

Where am I wrong?

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4 Answers 4

<math.h> is a standard header file, and the use of #include <math.h> makes it prefer the standard header file path over the current directory, unless you give your current directory precedence (by using the -I switch to specify an include path, as an example).

If you use #include "math.h" instead, the compiler will search the current directory first. Alternatively, you can rename your header file to something different from math.h.

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The problem is that #include <math.h> searches for the standard library's version, not yours. Use the double quotes instead of the angle brackets:

#include "math.h"
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#include <...>: the <...> means "search in the include path"

#include "...": the "..." means "search un the actual path, if you don't find the header, then search in the include path"

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The error says "function" not declared in this scope -- I notice that in all of the uses of what I suspect you intend to mean as 'function', you spell it as 'fonction' with an 'o'. Double-check that you have consistent spelling between uses and declaration.

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