Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to format some numbers in a Java program. The numbers will be both doubles and integers. When handling doubles, I want to keep only two decimal points but when handling integers I want the program to keep them unaffected. In other words:

Doubles - Input

14.0184849945

Doubles - Output

14.01

Integers - Input

13

Integers - Output

13 (not 13.00)

Is there a way to implement this in the same DecimalFormat instance? My code is the following, so far:

DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("#,###,##0.00");
DecimalFormatSymbols otherSymbols = new   DecimalFormatSymbols(Locale.ENGLISH);
otherSymbols.setDecimalSeparator('.');
otherSymbols.setGroupingSeparator(',');
df.setDecimalFormatSymbols(otherSymbols);
share|improve this question
4  
Why does it have to be the same DecimalFormat instance? What's wrong with having 2 DecimalFormat instances, one to keep two digits past the decimal point, and one not to have any digits past the decimal point? –  rgettman Apr 30 '13 at 21:29
    
Because the numbers which the program formats every time are either doubles or integers, without knowing the type before the formation. So, I want the same instance which will "understand" whether a number is double -to trim extra decimal points- or it is an integer -to keep it unaffected. –  PiXel1225 May 1 '13 at 9:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can just set the minimumFractionDigits to 0. Like this:

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(format(14.0184849945)); // prints '14.01'
        System.out.println(format(13)); // prints '13'
        System.out.println(format(3.5)); // prints '3.5'
        System.out.println(format(3.138136)); // prints '3.13'
    }

    public static String format(Number n) {
        NumberFormat format = DecimalFormat.getInstance();
        format.setRoundingMode(RoundingMode.FLOOR);
        format.setMinimumFractionDigits(0);
        format.setMaximumFractionDigits(2);
        return format.format(n);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that solved the problem! :) –  PiXel1225 May 1 '13 at 10:43

Could you not just wrapper this into a Utility call. For example

public class MyFormatter {

  private static DecimalFormat df;
  static {
    df = new DecimalFormat("#,###,##0.00");
    DecimalFormatSymbols otherSymbols = new   DecimalFormatSymbols(Locale.ENGLISH);
    otherSymbols.setDecimalSeparator('.');
    otherSymbols.setGroupingSeparator(',');
    df.setDecimalFormatSymbols(otherSymbols);
  }

  public static <T extends Number> String format(T number) {
     if (Integer.isAssignableFrom(number.getClass())
       return number.toString();

     return df.format(number);
  }
}

You can then just do things like: MyFormatter.format(int) etc.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.