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I have gotten used to programming in PHP with the foreach statement:

Is there an equivalent to this in Lua?

Thanks!

Relevant sections:

function renderobjects()
    o1 = object:new{x = 30, y = 30, roomx = 0, roomy = 0, symbol = "t", name = "Tree"}
    o2 = object:new{x = 47, y = 60, roomx = 0, roomy = 0, symbol = "w", name = "Water"}
    o3 = object:new{x = 42, y = 30, roomx = 1, roomy = 0, symbol = "C", name = "Cactus"}
    table.insert(o1, objects)
    table.insert(o2, objects)
    table.insert(o3, objects)
    table.foreachi(objects, object) do
        if player.roomx = object.roomx and player.roomy = object.roomy then
            rb.putsxy(object.x, object.y, symbol)
        end
    end
end

local object = {
    x = 30,
    y = 30,
    roomx = 0,
    roomy = 0,
    name = "Unknown Object",
    touchingplayer = false,
    symbol = "u"
}

function object:new (o)
    o = o or {}   -- create object if user does not provide one
    setmetatable(o, self)
    self.__index = self
    return o
end
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Please check here: lua.org/pil/7.1.html –  Sumoanand Apr 30 '13 at 21:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your example is simply:

function renderobjects()
    -- ... some of your code elided
    for _,object in ipairs(objects) do
        if player.roomx == object.roomx and player.roomy == object.roomy then
            rb.putsxy(object.x, object.y, object.symbol)
        end
    end
end

Note == not = in comparisons.

In this case ipairs works because you are using objects as an array.

You can create custom iterators like ipairs to iterate over other structured data types using the generic for statement.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so very much! That's exactly what I was looking for, I'll test it now. –  William Apr 30 '13 at 23:11
    
The program compiles just fine, however, nothing renders on the screen. Is there something I'm missing? –  William May 1 '13 at 0:56
    
Try redering something unconditionally to make sure it's not your logic that is flawed. This is a separate issue from the foreach question, so you should start a new question if you remain stymied. –  Doug Currie May 1 '13 at 1:12

Lua has 2 built-in iterators over tables.

pairs() iterates over all entries in a table, but in no particular order:

t={monday=1, tuesday=2, wednesday=3, thursday=4, friday=5, saturday=6, sunday=0, [7]="fooday"}
for key, value in pairs(t) do                       
   print(value, key)
end

Output:

0   sunday
fooday  7
2   tuesday
3   wednesday
5   friday
4   thursday
6   saturday
1   monday

ipairs() iterates over table entries with positive integer keys, and is used to iterate over lists in order.

l={'monday', 'tuesday', 'wednesday', 'thursday', 'friday', 'saturday', 'sunday', not_a_number='fooday', [0]='today', [-1]='yesterday' }
for key, value in ipairs(l) do                                                                         
  print(key, value)
end

Output:

1   monday
2   tuesday
3   wednesday
4   thursday
5   friday
6   saturday
7   sunday

Note that ipairs() ignores non-numeric and non-positive integer keys.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the comprehensive answer, I read over the LUA documentation and saw it. However, it's a one dimentional array with objects I'm using, I'll post code above. –  William Apr 30 '13 at 21:37

So assuming that objects is a global (or at least outside the lexical scope of renderobjects), you could re-write renderobjects like this:

-- Master list of objects to be rendered and processed
objects = {}

-- Create some objects to render
objects[#objects+1] = object:new{
    x = 30, y = 30, 
    roomx = 0, roomy = 0, 
    symbol = "t", 
    name = "Tree",
}
objects[#objects+1] = object:new{
    x = 47, y = 60, 
    roomx = 0, roomy = 0, 
    symbol = "w", 
    name = "Water",
}
objects[#objects+1] = object:new{
    x = 42, y = 30, 
    roomx = 1, roomy = 0, 
    symbol = "C", 
    name = "Cactus",
}

-- Render the objects in the global list objects.
-- with some special care for player and using the
-- global rb to draw
function renderobjects()
    for _,obj in ipairs(objects) do
        if player.roomx == obj.roomx 
            and player.roomy == obj.roomy then                        
            rb.putsxy(obj.x, obj.y, obj.symbol)
        end
    end
end

This uses a standard idiom to extend the list in a table, using the # operator to learn the current length of the list. This idiom is similar in effect to table.insert(), but usually faster. Note that your code had the arguments to table.insert reversed, and so was appending the (probably empty) global list of objects on to each of o1, o2, and o3.

I've also separated out the initialization of the handful of demo objects from the render call. They don't go there....

I rewrote the loop using the generic for construction with an iterator returned from ipairs. Instead of writing that as for _,obj in ipairs(objects) do it could be written as for i=1,#objects do local obj = objects[i]. The latter is slightly faster, as it doesn't involve a function call per loop iteration, but it can be slightly less clear to some readers. Either way, clarity of expression should trump all other concerns until you have profiling data to show that this is a bottleneck.

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