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I am trying to execute a register class.But the query does not work(the query is highlighted. It seems to be a simple problem but i don't see it. I echo the query and copy and execute it via phpmyadmin sql query box, it says error 1064. I can't seem to find any problem with it.

    <?php
class register
{
    protected $username;
    protected $password;
    protected $email;
    protected $postcode;

    public function __construct()
    {   
    }

    public function insertuser($username, $password,$email, $postcode)
    {
        $this->_email = mysql_real_escape_string($email);
        $this->_password = mysql_real_escape_string($password);
        $this->_username = mysql_real_escape_string($username);
        $this->_postcode = mysql_real_escape_string($postcode);



    **$query = "INSERT INTO 'users'('user_id', 'username', 'password', 'email', 'postcode') VALUES  (NULL,'{$username}','{$password}','{$email}','{$postcode}');";**


        echo $query;
        $result = mysql_query($query);
        return $result;
    }


}
?>
share|improve this question
    
You are using quotes incorrectly. Also you should not be using regular mysql, instead research mysqli or PDO. –  Tomanow Apr 30 '13 at 21:27
1  
I see this type of question all the time, you should read common database debugging for PHP and MySQL. –  Jason McCreary Apr 30 '13 at 21:27
1  
Please, don't use mysql_* functions in new code. They are no longer maintained and are officially deprecated. See the red box? Learn about prepared statements instead, and use PDO or MySQLi - this article will help you decide which. If you choose PDO, here is a good tutorial. –  ceejayoz Apr 30 '13 at 21:30

4 Answers 4

error 1064 means SQL syntax error. You used single quotes around the table name and the column names: ' . Replace them by backtics: `

"INSERT INTO `users` (
  `user_id`, `username`, `password`, `email`, `postcode`
) VALUES  (
   NULL,'{$username}','{$password}','{$email}','{$postcode}'
);"

Further note, that you should not write new code using the mysql extension. It has been marked deprecated by the PHP developers. Use PDO or mysqli instead.

share|improve this answer

The syntax seems to be wrong. Table and column names should not have quotes around them. They should have backticks or nothing. Otherwise they are treated as string literals.

INSERT INTO users (user_id, username, password, email, postcode)
VALUES  (NULL,'{$username}','{$password}','{$email}','{$postcode}')

You also don't need the field list if the values list is complete and in order. The ending semicolon is undesirable (though ineffective).


Your code is vulnerable to injection. You should use properly parameterized queries with PDO or mysqli

share|improve this answer

You should definitely consider switching to mysqli in addition to using prepared statements. Using prepared statements will make your queries easier and further protect you from injections.

See http://php.net/manual/en/mysqli.prepare.php

As for your errors, there are a few things wrong. Do not call the DB using quotes. Do not treat table names with quotes. Those are all things pointed out by Explosion Pills.

Finally, I don't see where you opened a mysqli connection.

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You have single quotes around your table and columns. You are confusing these with backticks - which are unnecessary unless you have used a reserved word (which you should avoid IMO).

Also, you were not using your sanitized variables and therefore vulnerable to SQL injection.

INSERT INTO users (user_id, username, password, email, postcode) VALUES (NULL,'{$this->_username}','{$this->_password}','{$this->_email}','{$this->_postcode}');

Obligatory: The mysql_* functions will be deprecated in PHP 5.5. It is not recommended for writing new code as it will be removed in the future. Instead, either the MySQLi or PDO and be a better PHP Developer.

share|improve this answer
    
Single quotes around column names are always wrong. If you want to enclose column names, you should use backticks. –  Arjan Apr 30 '13 at 21:40
    
Looks like I left out the backtick line. See update. –  Jason McCreary May 1 '13 at 1:17

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