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I'm curious about the differences between calling a Func directly vs using Invoke() on it. Is there a difference ? Is the first, syntactical sugar, and calls Invoke() underneath anyway ?

public T DoWork<T>(Func<T> method)
{
    return (T)method.Invoke();
}

vs

public T DoWork<T>(Func<T> method)
{
    return (T)method();
}

Or am I on the wrong track entirely :) Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted

There's no difference at all. The second is just a shorthand for Invoke, provided by the compiler. They compile to the same IL.

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Thanks, Jon. I thought that was the case. –  Tris Apr 30 '13 at 21:36
    
Leaving the Invoke() method off is resulting in the compiler error: "Cannot implicitly convert type 'System.Func<T>' to 'T' ". I'm compiling against .NET 4. –  Mike Dec 6 '13 at 0:31
1  
@Mike: That would happen if you'd missed the brackets off as well - i.e. tried to return (T)method rather than (T)method(). –  Jon Skeet Dec 6 '13 at 6:44
    
@JonSkeet So is this guy wrong here: social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/… –  superlogical Dec 12 '13 at 19:53
1  
@superlogical: There are two problems here. Firstly, the question there is about the difference between calling a method directly and calling it via a delegate. That's not the same as the difference between foo() and foo.Invoke() where foo is a variable of a delegate type. The other problem is that the answer seems to be talking about Control.Invoke, which isn't the same as calling Invoke on a delegate. –  Jon Skeet Dec 13 '13 at 7:29
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