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I'm trying to grep for lines in the first field of an output that are greater than a given number. In this instance, that number is 755. Ultimately, what I'm doing is trying to list every file with privileges greater than (and not equal to) 755 by using stat -c '%a %n' * and then pipe to some grep'ing (or possibly sed'ing?) to obtain this final list. Any ideas how this could best be accomplished?

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2  
Since 755 is really an octal number representing a sequence of bits, what exactly does "greater than" mean? 666 gives everyone write access; is that "greater than" 755? Is 755 "greater than" 666? –  Keith Thompson May 1 '13 at 0:04
    
OS X users: The equivalent of stat -c '%a %n' * (Linux) appears to be stat -f '%Lp %N' * –  mklement0 May 1 '13 at 3:11
    
the person is asking for grep, while people still giving awk? –  Soncire Jan 23 '14 at 4:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

try this:

stat -c '%a %n' *|awk '$1>755'

if you just want the filename in your final output, skip the privilege numbers, you could:

stat -c '%a %n' *|awk '$1>755{print $2}'

EDIT

actually you could do the chmod within awk. but you should make sure the user execute the awk line has the permission to change those files.

stat -c '%a %n' *|awk '$1>755{system("chmod 755 "$2)}'

again, assume the filename has no spaces.

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Oh thanks for that little add-on. I was just going to cut out field 2, but yours accomplishes it in one less pipe! –  user2150250 Apr 30 '13 at 22:35
    
Watch out for filenames with spaces. –  Carl Norum Apr 30 '13 at 22:37
1  
@user2150250 note, my 2nd awk one-liner assumes that your filename has no space. –  Kent Apr 30 '13 at 22:38
1  
Just add | xargs chmod 755 to that command line. –  Carl Norum Apr 30 '13 at 23:01
1  
@user2150250 you could actually do the chmod within awk, see the EDIT in ansewr. –  Kent Apr 30 '13 at 23:46

I'd use awk(1):

stat -c '%a %n' * | awk '$1 > 755'

The awk pattern matches lines where the first field is greater then 755. You could add an action if you want to print a subset of a line or something different, too (See @Kent's answer).

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Neither grep nor sed are good at arithmetics. awk could help (unfortunately I don't know it). But note that find can be handy here, too:

   -perm mode
          File's permission bits are exactly  mode  (octal  or  symbolic).
          Since  an  exact match is required, if you want to use this form
          for symbolic modes, you may have to  specify  a  rather  complex
          mode  string.  For example -perm g=w will only match files which
          have mode 0020 (that is, ones for which group  write  permission
          is  the  only  permission set).  It is more likely that you will
          want to use the `/' or `-' forms, for example -perm -g=w,  which
          matches  any file with group write permission.  See the EXAMPLES
          section for some illustrative examples.

   -perm -mode
          All of the permission bits mode are set for the file.   Symbolic
          modes  are accepted in this form, and this is usually the way in
          which would want to use them.  You must specify `u', `g' or  `o'
          if  you use a symbolic mode.   See the EXAMPLES section for some
          illustrative examples.

   -perm /mode
          Any of the permission bits mode are set for the file.   Symbolic
          modes  are  accepted in this form.  You must specify `u', `g' or
          `o' if you use a symbolic mode.  See the  EXAMPLES  section  for
          some  illustrative  examples.  If no permission bits in mode are
          set, this test matches any file (the idea here is to be  consis‐
          tent with the behaviour of -perm -000).

So what could work for you is:

find . -perm -755 -printf '%m %p\n'

Just remove the -printf part if you only need filenames.

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