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So I've got this Hash. It looks like this:

{
  'arg0' => '126150656000',
  'arg1' => 'Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-2640M CPU @ 2.80GHz',
  'arg2' => '2790',
  'arg3' => '3276320768',
  'arg4' => '8467496960',
  'arg5' => 'Windows 7',
  'arg6' => '6.1',
  'arg7' => 'amd64',
  'arg8' => '2',
  'arg9' => '1920',
  'arg10' => '1200',
  'arg11' => '32',
}

The Hash needs to be transformed into an array of positional args based on the 'argN' position of the key. Like so.

[
  '126150656000',
  'Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-2640M CPU @ 2.80GHz',
  '2790',
  '3276320768',
  '8467496960',
  'Windows 7',
  '6.1',
  'amd64',
  '2',
  '1920',
  '1200',
  '32'
]

The goal here is that [0] == ['arg0'], [1] == ['arg1'], [N] == ['argN'].

NOTE:

The keys can NOT be guaranteed to be in the correct order. For example the hash above may have 'arg9' "before" 'arg4'. Sorry for not making that clear.

share|improve this question
    
I take it that your hash might not already be ordered as in your example? Then it would be trivial. –  squiguy Apr 30 '13 at 22:49
    
You are correct. The Hash can not be expected to have the keys in order as the example above. –  Ryan Montgomery Apr 30 '13 at 22:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
 h.sort_by { | a, _ | a.gsub(/[^\d]/, '').to_i }.map(&:last)
share|improve this answer
    
Totally works. You rock. –  Ryan Montgomery Apr 30 '13 at 23:07
    
I think it still would - sort_by on a hash did (and still does) return an array of pairs. –  Frederick Cheung Apr 30 '13 at 23:15
    
@FrederickCheung I just tried it, and you're quite correct! I thought that would change the order of the Hash for an ordered Hash. –  Darshan-Josiah Barber Apr 30 '13 at 23:17
    
@undur_gongor Ah, that explains it. Sorry for confusing matters. –  Darshan-Josiah Barber Apr 30 '13 at 23:17

Disorganizing your Hash first:

h = {
  'arg1' => 'Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-2640M CPU @ 2.80GHz',
  'arg3' => '3276320768',
  'arg4' => '8467496960',
  'arg7' => 'amd64',
  'arg5' => 'Windows 7',
  'arg2' => '2790',
  'arg6' => '6.1',
  'arg9' => '1920',
  'arg8' => '2',
  'arg0' => '126150656000',
  'arg10' => '1200',
  'arg11' => '32',
}

You can do this:

h.keys.sort.map{|k| h[k]}
# => ["126150656000", "Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-2640M CPU @ 2.80GHz", "1200",
#     "32", "2790", "3276320768", "8467496960", "Windows 7", "6.1",
#     "amd64", "2", "1920"]

Update: This is assuming that you want your keys sorted in standard sort order, which if they are literally 'arg0' through 'arg11', isn't what you expect. I'm guessing your actually keys are something more useful. If these are you actual keys, you might do:

h.keys.sort_by{|s| s[3..-1].to_i}.map{|k| h[k]}
# => ["126150656000", "Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-2640M CPU @ 2.80GHz", "2790",
#     "3276320768", "8467496960", "Windows 7", "6.1", "amd64", "2", "1920",
#     "1200", "32"]
share|improve this answer
    
10 and 11 are in the wrong position. –  undur_gongor Apr 30 '13 at 22:57
    
This sort will put the arg1 next to arg10 and arg11 (since it's just a string sort), as your results show. –  Frederick Cheung Apr 30 '13 at 22:57
    
@undur_gongor Thanks for pointing that out. I was assuming those were fake keys and that the real keys would sort in the desired order. I updated my answer in case those are the actual keys. –  Darshan-Josiah Barber Apr 30 '13 at 23:08
    
@FrederickCheung Thanks, I updated my answer in case OP actually has those particular keys that don't sort as might be desired with a basic sort. –  Darshan-Josiah Barber Apr 30 '13 at 23:09

The answers provided are good if the hash contains keys that are unsorted. Based on your example, it looks like they are already ordered. If thats the case, then all you need to do is do {}.values to obtain the "ordered" array of the values.

share|improve this answer
    
They are not always in order. –  Ryan Montgomery Apr 30 '13 at 23:07

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