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How can I loop this code so that it asks the user to search for another file if the file has not been found?

import os, sys
from stat import *
from os.path import join

lookfor = input("\nPlease enter file name you want to search? \n")
def search(directory):
      for files in os.listdir(directory):
            fileItem = os.path.join(directory, files)
            fileItemStatInfo = os.stat(fileItem)
            if S_ISDIR(fileItemStatInfo.st_mode):
                  search(fileItem)
            elif S_ISREG(fileItemStatInfo.st_mode):
                  print("Searching", fileItem)
                  if lookfor in files:
                        print("\nThe File Has Been Found: %s" % join(directory, lookfor))
                        break
share|improve this question
    
Question is too localized. Can't see it being of general use. –  fgb Apr 30 '13 at 23:41
    
@fgb: Actually, this general problem—"How do I loop around input and testing the input?"—is very general, and comes up all the time. The other stuff (everything inside the search function) is just a red herring, except for the fact that it has to return something. So really, this is likely a dup. But I can't find a good question to link it to. –  abarnert Apr 30 '13 at 23:45
    
@abarnert: Yeah, I guess the gist of the issue is that the question is poorly posed. We should find the dupe, if it exists. –  fgb Apr 30 '13 at 23:47

2 Answers 2

First, you need to make search return success or failure:

def search(directory):
      for files in os.listdir(directory):
            fileItem = os.path.join(directory, files)
            fileItemStatInfo = os.stat(fileItem)
            if S_ISDIR(fileItemStatInfo.st_mode):
                  return search(fileItem)
            elif S_ISREG(fileItemStatInfo.st_mode):
                  print("Searching", fileItem)
                  if lookfor in files:
                        print("\nThe File Has Been Found: %s" % join(directory, lookfor))
                        return True

(Note that if we fall off the end of the for loop, we'll fall off the end of the function, which means we return None. Therefore, the function an only return True, with is truthy, or None, which is not.)

Now, you just loop until it returns something true:

while True:
    lookfor=input("\nPlease enter file name you want to search? \n")
    if search(lookfor):
        break
    print('Could not find that file, sorry. Try again.')

All that said, I don't think search does what you want it to—and you can simplify it tremendously, too.

First, I'm not sure whether you're trying to use lookfor as a global variable, or as a closure within the search function… but either way, you probably shouldn't be doing that. Pass it as an argument.

Also, having a variable named files that holds each filename, instead of a collection of them, is very confusing.

If you want to walk a directory tree recursively, use os.walk instead of trying to implement it yourself.

And you should probably be printing out the found filename, not the looked-for fragment.

Putting that together:

def search(lookfor, directory):
    for dirpath, dirnames, filenames in os.walk(directory):
        for filename in filenames:
            if lookfor in filename:
                print("\nThe File Has Been Found: %s" % join(dirpath, filename))
                return True

Of course in most real-life code, you'll probably want to return the pathname, so the rest of your code can use it (e.g., to open the file), instead of just printing it out:

def search(lookfor, directory):
    for dirpath, dirnames, filenames in os.walk(directory):
        for filename in filenames:
            if lookfor in filename:
                return join(dirpath, filename)

while True:
    lookfor=input("\nPlease enter file name you want to search? \n")
    path = search(lookfor)
    if path:
        break
    print('Could not find that file, sorry. Try again.')

with open(path) as f:
    pass # now we can actually use the file we searched so hard for
share|improve this answer

I got a simple solution. Put a

while 0 < 1:

at the start of the script. It will loop every time.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't remotely answer the question. –  fgb Apr 30 '13 at 23:09
1  
@fgb: But on the plus side, it's an incorrect answer to the completely wrong question (because this will just raise an IndentationError and immediately quit), which isn't quite as bad as a working answer to the completely wrong question. :) –  abarnert Apr 30 '13 at 23:15
    
@abarnert: Touché! –  fgb Apr 30 '13 at 23:25

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