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I am trying to understand some python code that tries to predict prices based on an ad posting.

Before fitting the text vectorizers, a function does hstack((des, titles)) to the ad description des and ad title titles.

Question: What is the reason for doing the hstack? I dont see any difference between des and merged when printing it out. merged appears to be used as the training data instead of passing in des and titles seperately. How does this work?

Vectorizing function

def fit(des, titles, sal, clf, alpha):
    tRidge = time()
    vect = TfidfVectorizer(min_df=1,ngram_range=(1,3),max_features=24000000)
    vect2 = TfidfVectorizer(min_df=1,ngram_range=(1,3),max_features=24000000)
    des = vect.fit_transform(des)
    titles = vect2.fit_transform(titles)
    merged = hstack((des, titles))
    print des, "\n\n\n\n"
    print titles, "\n\n\n\n"
    print merged

    rr = linear_model.Ridge(alpha= alpha)
    rr.fit(merged,sals)

    return vect, vect2, rr 

Result

(0, 2991)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2989)   0.156938669001
(0, 2988)   0.183108029528
(0, 2984)   0.183108029528
(0, 2983)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2982)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2981)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2976)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2974)   0.0784693345005
(0, 2973)   0.1373027904
(0, 2968)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2967)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2966)   0.183108029528
(0, 2859)   0.0610360098426
(0, 2858)   0.0610360098426
(0, 2855)   0.0548137869472
(0, 2811)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2810)   0.0610360098426
(0, 2807)   0.0548137869472
(0, 2671)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2670)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2663)   0.0784693345005
(0, 2662)   0.0784693345005
(0, 2659)   0.0819523573892
(0, 2642)   0.0923069427531
:   :
(9, 225)    0.0518713890037
(9, 208)    0.105028746631
(9, 155)    0.0518713890037
(9, 154)    0.0518713890037
(9, 153)    0.0518713890037
(9, 152)    0.0518713890037
(9, 151)    0.0518713890037
(9, 149)    0.0440954196221
(9, 140)    0.0835380774247
(9, 135)    0.0518713890037
(9, 134)    0.0518713890037
(9, 132)    0.0881908392442
(9, 131)    0.0771565630894
(9, 122)    0.0518713890037
(9, 121)    0.0518713890037
(9, 118)    0.0518713890037
(9, 117)    0.0518713890037
(9, 116)    0.0771565630894
(9, 25) 0.0518713890037
(9, 8)  0.0518713890037
(9, 7)  0.0440954196221
(9, 6)  0.0440954196221
(9, 5)  0.0518713890037
(9, 4)  0.0518713890037
(9, 3)  0.0518713890037 




(0, 69) 0.42208707303
(0, 68) 0.42208707303
(0, 27) 0.42208707303
(0, 26) 0.42208707303
(0, 24) 0.379058050386
(0, 0)  0.379058050386
(1, 62) 0.42435658025
(1, 61) 0.42435658025
(1, 60) 0.42435658025
(1, 28) 0.42435658025
(1, 23) 0.42435658025
(1, 22) 0.315606501824
(2, 59) 0.346009923908
(2, 58) 0.346009923908
(2, 44) 0.346009923908
(2, 43) 0.346009923908
(2, 42) 0.346009923908
(2, 7)  0.346009923908
(2, 6)  0.346009923908
(2, 5)  0.346009923908
(2, 0)  0.205467906151
(3, 70) 0.343926205461
(3, 69) 0.227413915309
(3, 68) 0.227413915309
(3, 41) 0.343926205461
:   :
(7, 16) 0.231189334057
(7, 12) 0.271958221129
(7, 11) 0.271958221129
(7, 10) 0.271958221129
(8, 76) 0.265672282889
(8, 75) 0.265672282889
(8, 74) 0.265672282889
(8, 73) 0.265672282889
(8, 72) 0.265672282889
(8, 53) 0.265672282889
(8, 52) 0.22584571227
(8, 51) 0.22584571227
(8, 35) 0.265672282889
(8, 18) 0.265672282889
(8, 17) 0.265672282889
(8, 16) 0.22584571227
(8, 15) 0.265672282889
(8, 14) 0.265672282889
(8, 13) 0.265672282889
(9, 65) 0.435367791014
(9, 64) 0.435367791014
(9, 63) 0.370102397554
(9, 22) 0.323795863959
(9, 9)  0.435367791014
(9, 8)  0.435367791014 




(0, 2991)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2989)   0.156938669001
(0, 2988)   0.183108029528
(0, 2984)   0.183108029528
(0, 2983)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2982)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2981)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2976)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2974)   0.0784693345005
(0, 2973)   0.1373027904
(0, 2968)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2967)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2966)   0.183108029528
(0, 2859)   0.0610360098426
(0, 2858)   0.0610360098426
(0, 2855)   0.0548137869472
(0, 2811)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2810)   0.0610360098426
(0, 2807)   0.0548137869472
(0, 2671)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2670)   0.0923069427531
(0, 2663)   0.0784693345005
(0, 2662)   0.0784693345005
(0, 2659)   0.0819523573892
(0, 2642)   0.0923069427531
:   :
(7, 3669)   0.231189334057
(7, 3665)   0.271958221129
(7, 3664)   0.271958221129
(7, 3663)   0.271958221129
(8, 3729)   0.265672282889
(8, 3728)   0.265672282889
(8, 3727)   0.265672282889
(8, 3726)   0.265672282889
(8, 3725)   0.265672282889
(8, 3706)   0.265672282889
(8, 3705)   0.22584571227
(8, 3704)   0.22584571227
(8, 3688)   0.265672282889
(8, 3671)   0.265672282889
(8, 3670)   0.265672282889
(8, 3669)   0.22584571227
(8, 3668)   0.265672282889
(8, 3667)   0.265672282889
(8, 3666)   0.265672282889
(9, 3718)   0.435367791014
(9, 3717)   0.435367791014
(9, 3716)   0.370102397554
(9, 3675)   0.323795863959
(9, 3662)   0.435367791014
(9, 3661)   0.435367791014
share|improve this question
1  
Do you not know the type function? If you want to know "what kind of object foo is", instead of doing a print foo and trying to guess, do print type(foo) and you'll get the answer. Then you can look it up online. Or, you can usually skip all that and just do help(foo) right there in the interactive interpreter. – abarnert May 1 '13 at 0:29
    
I'm new to python, thanks for the tip! <class 'scipy.sparse.csr.csr_matrix'> – Nyxynyx May 1 '13 at 1:02
    
Well, a csr_matrix is just a "compressed sparse-row matrix". It's handy when you have a huge matrix where a lot of the rows are empty, but basically, you can think of it as a plain-old matrix. – abarnert May 1 '13 at 1:54
    
@abarnert: actually it saves space whenever the matrix contains a lot of zeros, not only when there are empty rows. The "compressed row" name refers to a compressed representation of row indices, compared to the more straightforward coordinate sparse matrix format. – Fred Foo May 1 '13 at 14:45

hstack just takes a sequence of arrays and stacks them up horizontally, as the name implies. For example:

>>> a = np.array([[1,2], [3,4]])
>>> b = np.array([[5], [6]])
>>> np.hstack(a, b)
array([[1, 2, 5],
       [3, 4, 6]])

In the special case where the sequence is all 1D arrays, this just concatenates them into a longer 1D array:

>>> a = np.array([1,2,3])
>>> b = np.array([4,5])
>>> np.hstack(a, b)
array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5])

So, if des and titles are just 1D arrays, so is merged, and the output you're seeing looks pretty reasonable.

So, are they? Well, here's how they're constructed:

vect = TfidfVectorizer(min_df=1,ngram_range=(1,3),max_features=24000000)
des = vect.fit_transform(des)

TfidfVectorizer returns a (sparse) matrix of TF-IDF features. I'm not sure what fit_transform is, but from the name, it sure sounds like a fitting function which would take a matrix and return a coefficient vector.

So, why do they look like 2D arrays when you print them out? My guess is that they're 1D arrays of objects, with each object itself having some structure. After all, a 2-column matrix where column 0 is a 2-tuple and column 1 is a float isn't going to buy you much over a flat vector where each element is a 2-tuple of a 2-tuple and a float.

To see the structure of an array (or matrix) better, you can always look at its shape, its dtype, and one of its members (des[0] if it's 1D, des[0,0] if 2D, etc.). If I'm right, the shape will be something like (12345,), the dtype object, and des[0] ((0, 2991), 0.0923069427531).

You can also print out the repr of the array instead of its str. (The repr is what you get when you just evaluate an object at the interactive prompt; the str is what you get when you print it. If you want to print the repr, you have to do it explicitly: print repr(des).) This will show you the brackets and commas, instead of a nice tabular format, and you should be able to tell the shape at a glance.

So, if des has a shape of, say, (12345,), and titles has a shape of, say, (67890,), then hstack((des, titles)) will have a shape of, say, (80235,), and just printing it out and giving it a cursory scan, you'll be hard-pressed to see the difference between it and des.

Finally, how is this different from just training with des then titles separately? Well, depending on the training model, it may well just be a more concise way of doing the exact same thing. But it's possible that some trainers use references between two data points in the same set, in which case the results will be different. (Look at it intuitively, as an English-speaking human trying to train yourself to pronounce Spanish. If you just get a bunch of examples that the letter "g" sometimes sounds like a hard "g", and sometimes like an "h", it will be hard to learn the rule—but if, at the same time, you also get examples that the letter "j" is always pronounced "h", then you probably will get the rule, because "g" and "j" have the same sound in Spanish in the exact same cases as in English, it's just a different sound.)

share|improve this answer

scipy.sparse.hstack concatenates the sparse tf-idf matrices returned by TfidfVectorizer.fit_transform. Try the following at your Python prompt:

>>> from scipy.sparse import csr_matrix, hstack
>>> x = csr_matrix([[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6]])
>>> x
<2x3 sparse matrix of type '<type 'numpy.int32'>'
        with 6 stored elements in Compressed Sparse Row format>
>>> x.toarray()
array([[1, 2, 3],
       [4, 5, 6]])
>>> hstack([x, x])
<2x6 sparse matrix of type '<type 'numpy.int32'>'
        with 12 stored elements in Compressed Sparse Row format>
>>> hstack([x, x]).toarray()
array([[1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3],
       [4, 5, 6, 4, 5, 6]])

Since according to scikit-learn conventions, rows indicate (training or test) samples while columns denote features, this code is combining tf-idf weights of n-gram features learned from full text with similar features (though differently weighted) from titles. It is computing the combination by just appending the matrices, which is perfectly valid as the ridge regression will learn per-feature (per-column) coefficient weights.

Unfortunately, printing sparse matrices doesn't yield very informative results (although it can be used for debugging or for later rebuilding the same matrix.

share|improve this answer

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