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Is it possible to use mocks within a constructor?

Class A{

    public B b = new B();

    public A( String input ){

        //I need to stub this method
        b.someMethod( input );
    }

    // Class implementations
}

Unit Test:

Class ATest{

    @Mock
    B b;
    @InjectMock
    A a;

    //option1:
    @Before
    setup(){
        MockitoAnnotations.initMocks( this ); //Fails - since A isnt instantiated
        a = new A();
    }

    //option2:
    @Before
    setup(){
        a = new A();
        MockitoAnnotations.initMocks( this ); // Fails in new A() due to method i want to stub as mocks werent initialized yet !
    }
}

How can i approach this? thanks in advance.

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2  
You really should avoid doing logic in the constructor. –  vertti May 1 '13 at 4:53
    
Does option 1 fail if you omit a = new A();? I would have expected the @InjectMocks annotation to instantiate A for you, in the call to initMocks. For alternate options, you may get some joy from code.google.com/p/mockito/wiki/MockingObjectCreation –  David Wallace May 1 '13 at 5:48
    
Yes it fails complaining it has to be instantiated –  broun May 2 '13 at 4:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This kind of design is hard to mock, and reveals a possible design flaw or at least weakness in your class under test. It probably calls for some kind of injection framework (i.e. Spring), so that you aren't explicitly calling the B constructor. Then your second test attempt would be spot on

If Spring is too heavy handed, there are lighter injection frameworks. Or finally, you could just pass B in as a constructor argument for A. Then you would have to use Mockito.mock(B.class) to make your B mock before passing it into the A constructor (and then you would forgo the use of the Mockito annotations).

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First thank for the response. Yes, like you said spring injection would work but this class is a part of a library, and shouldnt force a Spring dependency. The second option you mentioned will work but I was hoping if there is a clean solution for the issue. –  broun May 1 '13 at 5:13

I don't understand precisely what you are trying to do from this, but your second approach is correct. Only you need to instantiate the B class just as you did for A class. So, basically this is all you will need to do:

//option2:
@Before
setup(){

a = new A();
b = new B();
MockitoAnnotations.initMocks( this ); // Fails in new A() due to method i want to stub as       mocks werent initialized yet !

 }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I could be wrong, but I think you were missing the point. Setafire wants to mock B, but you are instantiating the real one. –  Kevin Welker May 1 '13 at 4:41

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