Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is similar to a question I posted today, but needs the request chained serially. I have two asynchronous requests, where the second request needs the result of first to send the query.

var Db.get = function(key){
    var deferred = $q.defer();

     //send async req
    var req = ....
    req.success = function(d){
        deferred.resolve(d)
    };
    req.failure = function(d){
        deferred.reject(d)
    }

    return deferred.promise;
}

var someFn = function(id){
    Db.get(id, "abc")
        .then(function (d) {
            console.log("At 1")
            Db.get(d.id, "def")
                .then(function (d) {
                    console.log("At 2")
                    return d
                }, function (e) {
                    //error
                });
        }, function (e) {
            //error
        });

    console.log("At 3")
};

I should be thinking it wrongly, as I expect console.log("At 3") never to be printed in success scenario as I return after console.log("At 2"). But when I run, in the console I see these order

console.log("At 1")
console.log("At 3")
console.log("At 2")

I was thinking then would block till it get response from the promise (returned by get() ). so, everything in someFn execute serially. Is this assumption wrong? What is the best way to chain two asynchronous operation, which uses promises, to run serially.

Thanks.

EDIT:

I tried what Ketan suggested Chaining Ajax calls in AngularJs .

var someFn = function(id){
            Db.get(id, "abc")
                .then(function (d) {
                    console.log("At 1")
                    return Db.get(d.id, "def")
                }).then(function (d) {
                    console.log("At 2")
                    return d
                }, function (e) {
                    //error
                    return null;
                }).then(function (d) {
                    return d;
        });

        console.log("At 3")
    };

Still, if I make a call like

var res = someFn(1)
console.log(res) /// undefined

chrome terminal shows At 2 after undefined. I am not sure why the result retuned by someFn not assigned to res.

share|improve this question
2  
See this question that Pawel answered yesterday. stackoverflow.com/questions/16284403/… –  Ketan May 1 '13 at 2:20
    
thanks Ketan. Will try it out. –  bsr May 1 '13 at 2:23
    
Because someFn didn't return anything. You need to use someFn().then() and access the value from within the function passed to then. Check out this video where I discuss promises: plus.google.com/events/cljavmi7kpup1fso43k3fkpk2eg –  Josh David Miller May 1 '13 at 7:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I was thinking then would block till it get response from the promise

No. Promises in JS are no transparent, blocking futures, but just a pattern to chain callbacks. The promise is returned before the callback is executed - and At 3 is logged after .then returns, but before the callback executed. And if you return in the callback, it doesn't really matter to the outer someFn.

You rather would use something like

var someFn = function(id){
    return Db.get(id, "abc")
      .then(function (d) {
        console.log("At 1")
        return Db.get(d.id, "def");
      })
      .then(function (d) {
        console.log("At 2")
        return d
      }, function (e) {
        //error
      });
}
someFn().then(function(d) {
    console.log("At 3")
});
share|improve this answer
    
thank you verymuch @Bergi –  bsr May 1 '13 at 2:57
    
on the same vein, what if someFn is,say, 5th in the chain. So, promise somewhere in the chain force all the function call up in the chain to work with promise. Analogous to throwing exception down the chain. In short, if someFn is called by another function (someFn2), would the caller of the someFn2 also need to use .then() to call someFn2. –  bsr May 1 '13 at 11:58

The place where your having difficulty is that .then doesn't actually block. It helps you convert synchronous code into asynchronous code, but it doesn't do so for you. Lets start by considering the synchronous code you are trying to re-write. Imagine Db.get was a synchronous function that returned a value, rather than a promise:

var someFn = function (id){
    try {
        var d = Db.get(id, "abc");
        console.log("At 1");
        var d = Db.get(d.id, "def");
        console.log("At 2")
        return d;
    } catch (ex) {
        console.log("At 3")
    }
};

In this case, when I call someFn I get a value, not a promise. That is to say the entire function is synchronous.

If we temporarily fast forward a few years and imagine we could use ES6. That would let us re-write your function as:

var someFn = $q.async(function* (id){
    try {
        var d = yield Db.get(id, "abc");
        console.log("At 1");
        var d = yield Db.get(d.id, "def");
        console.log("At 2")
        return d;
    } catch (ex) {
        console.log("At 3")
    }
});

That looks very similar, but this time we have Db.get returning a promise, and someFn() will also always return a promise. The yield keyword actually "pauses" the current function until the promise is fulfilled. This lets it look just like the synchronous code, but it's actually asynchronous.

Rewind to the present, and we need to work out how to write this. The second argument of a .then call is an error handler, so the exact equivalent to the ES6 example would be:

var someFn = function (id){
    return Db.get(id, "abc")
        .then(function (d) {
            console.log("At 1");
            return Db.get(d.id, "def");
        })
        .then(function (d) {
            console.log("At 2");
            return d;
        })
        .then(null, function (ex) {
            console.log("At 3")
        });
});

Note how each return is only returning from its current function scope. There's no way to force it to jump all the way out of someFn.

Another interesting experiment to do is:

Db.get('id', 'abc')
  .then(function () {
    console.log('B');
  });
console.log('A');

The above will always log:

A
B

because .then doesn't block.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.