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def averager(filename):
    f=open(filename, "r")
    avg=f.readlines()
    f.close()
    avgr=[]
    final=""
    x=0
    i=0
    while i < range(len(avg[0])):
        while x < range(len(avg)):
            avgr+=str((avg[x[i]]))
            x+=1
        final+=str((sum(avgr)/(len(avgr))))
        clear(avgr)
        i+=1
    return final

The error I get is:

File "C:\Users\konrad\Desktop\exp\trail3.py", line 11, in averager
    avgr+=str((avg[x[i]]))
TypeError: 'int' object has no attribute '__getitem__'
share|improve this question
    
Use for loops. They're really nice. – Blender May 1 '13 at 4:02
    
Instead of while i < range(len(avg[0])): and later i+=1 please do for i in range(len(avg[0])):. This saves you from having to pre-declare i and having to increment it explicitly. – Patashu May 1 '13 at 4:04
    
Much more comfortable with while loops, but Ill try. thanks for the feedback! – Konrad May 1 '13 at 4:05
    
@Konrad For loops are less lines, more meaningful and harder to screw up. Win-win-win. Python is all about readability savers like this. – Patashu May 1 '13 at 4:05
    
You're appending strings (avgr+=str((avg[x[i]]))) and then trying to sum them sum(avgr)?? – Ashwini Chaudhary May 1 '13 at 4:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Others have pointed out the root cause of your error. Here is a different way to write your method:

def csv_average(filename, column):
    """ Returns the average of the values in
        column for the csv file """

    column_values = []

    with open(filename) as f:
        reader = csv.reader(f)
        for row in reader:
            column_values.append(row[column])

    return sum(column_values) / len(column_values)
share|improve this answer

x is just an integer, so you can't index it.

So, this:

x[i]

Should never work. That's what the error is complaining about.

UPDATE

Since you asked for a recommendation on how to simplify your code (in a below comment), here goes:

Assuming your CSV file looks something like:

-9,2,12,90...
1423,1,51,-12...
...

You can read the file in like this:

with open(<filename>, 'r') as file_reader:
    file_lines = file_reader.read().split('\n')

Notice that I used .split('\n'). This causes the file's contents to be stored in file_lines as, well, a list of the lines in the file.

So, assuming you want the ith column to be summed, this can easily be done with comprehensions:

ith_col_sum = sum(float(line.split(',')[i]) for line in file_lines if line)

So then to average it all out you could just divide the sum by the number of lines:

average = ith_col_sum / len(file_lines)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Im fixing it now. Would you have any recommendations as how I could write this in a simpler format? – Konrad May 1 '13 at 4:08
    
@Konrad please see the additional stuff above. – mjgpy3 May 1 '13 at 4:24

Let's pick through this code:

def averager(filename):

averager as a name is not as clear as it could be. How about averagecsv, for example?

    f=open(filename, "r")
    avg=f.readlines()

avg is poorly named. It isn't the average of everything! It's a bunch of lines. Call it csvlines for example.

    f.close()
    avgr=[]

avgr is poorly named. What is it? Names should be meaningful, otherwise why give them?

    final=""
    x=0
    i=0
    while i < range(len(avg[0])):
        while x < range(len(avg)):

As mentioned in comments, you can replace these with for loops, as in for i in range(len(avg[0])):. This saves you from needing to declare and increment the variable in question.

            avgr+=str((avg[x[i]]))

Huh? Let's break this line down.

The poorly named avg is our lines from the csv file.

So, we index into avg by x, okay, that would give us the line number x. But... x[i] is meaningless, since x is an integer, and integers don't support array access. I guess what you're trying to do here is... split the file into rows, then the rows into columns, since it's csv. Right?

So let's ditch the code. You want something like this, using the split http://docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#str.split function:

totalaverage = 0
for col in range(len(csvlines[0].split(","))):
    average = 0
    for row in range(len(csvlines)):
        average += int(csvlines[row].split(",")[col])
    totalaverage += average/len(csvlines)
return totalaverage

BUT wait! There's more! Python has a built in csv parser that is safer than splitting by ,. Check it out here: http://docs.python.org/2/library/csv.html

share|improve this answer

In response to OP asking how he should go about this in one of the comments, here is my suggestion:

import csv
from collections import defaultdict    
with open('numcsv.csv') as f:
    reader = csv.reader(f)
    numbers = defaultdict(list) #used to avoid so each column starts with a list we can append to
    for row in reader:
        for column, value in enumerate(row,start=1):
            numbers[column].append(float(value)) #convert the value to a float 1. as the number may be a float and 2. when we calc average we need to force float division
    #simple comprehension to print the averages: %d = integer, %f = float. items() goes over key,value pairs
    print('\n'.join(["Column %d had average of: %f" % (i,sum(column)/(len(column))) for i,column in numbers.items()]))

Producing

>>> 
Column 1 had average of: 2.400000
Column 2 had average of: 2.000000
Column 3 had average of: 1.800000

For a file:

1,2,3
1,2,3
3,2,1
3,2,1
4,2,1
share|improve this answer

Here's two methods. The first one just gets the average for the line (what your code above looks like it's doing). The second gets the average for a column (which is what your question asked)

''' This just gets the avg for a line'''
def averager(filename):
  f=open(filename, "r")
  avg = f.readlines()
  f.close()

  count = 0
  for i in xrange(len(avg)):
    count += len(avg[i])

  return count/len(avg)

''' This gets a the avg for all "columns"
char is what we split on , ; | (etc)
'''
def averager2(filename, char):
  f=open(filename, "r")
  avg = f.readlines()
  f.close()

  count = 0 # count of items
  total = 0 # sum of all the lengths
  for i in xrange(len(avg)):
    cols = avg[i].split(char)
    count += len(cols)
    for j in xrange(len(cols)):
      total += len(cols[j].strip()) # Remove line endings

  return total/float(count)
share|improve this answer

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