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Take a look at this trivial python gobject program:

import threading
import gobject
import time

def f():
    while True:
        print "HELLO"
        time.sleep(1)
threading.Thread(target=f).start()

gobject.MainLoop().run()

It spawns a thread which outputs "HELLO" every second, then enters the gobject main loop. The problem is that it doesn't actually do anything. Why?

$ python a.py 
[...]

If I press CTRL+C, however, it starts to work. Also, removing the last line in the program (gobject.MainLoop().run()) makes it work. Why?

$ python a.py 
^CTraceback (most recent call last):
  File "a.py", line 11, in <module>
    gobject.MainLoop().run()
KeyboardInterruptHELLO

HELLO
HELLO
HELLO
[...]

Take a look at this second program, it's exactly the same as the first except it tells gobject to run the function g every second. This one sort of works, the spawned thread runs every once in a while, instead of never. Why?

import threading
import gobject
import time

def f():
    while True:
        print "HELLO"
        time.sleep(1)
threading.Thread(target=f).start()

def g():
    print "yo"
    return True
gobject.timeout_add_seconds(1, g)

gobject.MainLoop().run()

Running it:

$ python b.py 
HELLOyo

yo
yo
yo
 HELLO
yo
yo
yo
yo
yo
yo
yo
 HELLO
yo
yo
yo
yo
^CTraceback (most recent call last):
  File "b.py", line 16, in <module>
    gobject.MainLoop().run()
KeyboardInterrupt
HELLO
HELLO
HELLO
HELLO
HELLO

And once again, hitting CTRL+C makes the spawned thread work. Why?

This is using the library pygobject-2.28.6.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need to initialize threading when using gobject. To do so, call

gobject.threads_init()
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, this appears to fix it, but maybe it's just a coincidence, perhaps from changing the order of concurrent events. I find it absurd that a library would break the entire runtime unless you call a function in it before using it. Also, "For applications that wish to use Python threads to interact with the GNOME platform, GObject.threads_init() must be called prior to running or creating threads and starting main loops." doesn't cover my case because I'm only using gobject from the main thread. –  Dog May 1 '13 at 11:48
    
Even for glib in C, "if you use GLib from more than one thread, you must initialize the thread system by calling g_thread_init()." (developer.gnome.org/glib/2.30/glib-Threads.html#g-thread-init) –  Dog May 1 '13 at 11:50
    
I don't exactly know why a glib mainloop blocks all other threads, i would have guessed that it doesn't release the GIL while running unless you initialize it correctly. But I can't really find any reference to support that (other than what's here). –  mata May 1 '13 at 11:59

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