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I have a many-to-many mapping/pivot table I had to expose as an Entity in order to model a relationship similar to the following (as per this question Model Entity Framework many-many plus shared relation):

enter image description here

Now, I would like to emulate the EF collection Enumerate/Add/Remove functionality that is present on the navigation property of a 'stock' Entity Framework many-to-many relationship. How would I do that?

I'm hoping for something that I can still query without blowing my data performance. Obviously just implementing the following to bridge the pivot table doesn't accomplish this goal, and also doesn't follow the EF conventions for managing the collection:

public partial class Composition {
    public IEnumerable<Anthology> Anthologies {
        get {
            return CompositionAnthologies.Select(e => e.Anthology);
        }
    }

    public void AddAnthology(Anthology anthology)
    {
        CompositionAnthologies.Add(new CompositionAnthology() {
            Anthology = anthology,
            Composer = Composer
        });
    }
}

Can you point me at an example or recommend a starting point? (Note I'm using model-first currently, but would switch to code-first for a solution, since model-first seems to be fast becoming a second-class citizen.)


EDIT: Here's further info on the relationship and constraints.

The many-to-many relationship has a junction table ("CompositionAnthologies") including a binding ComposerId column, with necessary manually-created FK relations to enforce Composition.Composer == Anthology.Composer for all Anthology.Compositions (and Composition.Anthologies). Here is the relation as held by the junction table:

enter image description here

i.e.There must be no Compositions related to Anthologies, but having differing Composers.

share|improve this question
    
as you noted, Model first, as noble as it might be , does look second class nowadays. I switched 12 months ago. Code results for such relationships can be provided. But I thought the idea was you can model this in the designer. a=>b c=>b a=>c msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/jj713299 Doesnt this work ? –  phil soady May 1 '13 at 11:57
    
@soadyp: If by a, b, and c, you mean the three entities I've displayed above, the problems result from two main issues. 1: Although many-to-many is supported by the designer, the junction table cannot contain ancillary data (columns beyond the two foreign keys). 2: Because I must constrain Composition.Composer == Anthology.Composer for all Anthology.Compositions, I must add a binding column of Composer to the junction table. The end result is that I must materialize the junction table to be able to add rows from code. –  shannon May 1 '13 at 13:21
    
I dont think I grasp the full nature of the join constraint you have. In Code first, this sounds like a declared rather than generated join table with FKeys declared as required. good luck with the search. –  phil soady May 1 '13 at 13:44
    
@soadyp: There must be no Compositions related to Anthologies, but having differing Composers. I've tried to depict it in the diagram above. Does this make sense? –  shannon May 1 '13 at 13:50
    
The written explanation does make sense now. But this sounds like View or Code type constraints that must be applied. I wouldnt know how to do that with Code first FKey mappings alone. –  phil soady May 1 '13 at 13:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's my current solution. Still open to suggestions, as this obscures IQueryable, which has performance ramifications. It also doesn't have Context, so cannot delete junctions (notice the NotImplemented exceptions). The latter issue is not terribly important for me, because my data has a deleted flag that I use anyway.

Here's one side of the relation. They are symmetric.

public partial class Composition {
    public ICollection<Anthology> Anthologies {
        get {
            return new JunctionedAnthologies(this);
        }
    }
}

public class JunctionedAnthologies : ICollection<Anthology> {
    private readonly Composition _parent;

    public JunctionedAnthologies(Composition parent)
    {
        _parent = parent;
    }

    public void Add(Anthology item) {
        if (item.Composer == null) {
            if (_parent.Composer == null) throw new InvalidOperationException("The parent or child Composer must be set to form this association");
            item.Composer = _parent.Composer;
        }
        else if (_parent.Composer == null) {
            _parent.Composer = item.Composer;
        }
        else if (item.Composer != _parent.Composer) {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("The parent and child must not have a differing Composer assigned");
        }
        junction.Add(new CompositionAnthology() {
            Anthology = item,
            Composer = item.Composer
        });
    }

    public void Clear() {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public bool Contains(Anthology item) {
        return junction.Any(j => j.Anthology == item);
    }

    public void CopyTo(Anthology[] array, int arrayIndex) {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public int Count {
        get { return junction.Count; }
    }

    public bool IsReadOnly {
        get { return false; }
    }

    public bool Remove(Anthology item) {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public IEnumerator<Anthology> GetEnumerator() {
        return junction.Select(e => e.Anthology).GetEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }

    private ICollection<CompositionAnthology> junction {
        get {
            return _parent.CompositionAnthologies;
        }
    }
}
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