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I implemented Insertion Sort in C++ in 3 different ways. One uses basic C arrays, one uses vectors, and one uses iterators:

void insertionsort_array(int *arr, size_t length)
{
    for (int i = 1; i < length; i++)
        for (int k = i; k > 0 && arr[k] < arr[k-1]; k--)
            swap(arr[k], arr[k-1]);
}

template<typename T>
void insertionsort_vector(vector<T>& arr)
{
    for (int i = 1; i < arr.size(); i++)
        for (int k = i; k > 0 && arr[k] < arr[k-1]; k--)
            swap(arr[k], arr[k-1]);
}

template<class IterType>
void insertionsort_iterator(IterType iter, IterType end)
{
    for (IterType edge = iter + 1; edge != end; ++edge) 
        for (IterType ptr = edge; ptr != iter && *ptr < *(ptr-1); --ptr) 
            swap(*ptr, *(ptr-1));
}

I would expect the running times for these functions to differ by some constant. However, that is not the case (timings with GCC -O0):

// array
Sorting 1000000 lists of length 10:    2605531 usec
Sorting   50000 lists of length 100:   1268442 usec
Sorting     500 lists of length 1000:   787731 usec
Sorting       5 lists of length 10000:  759133 usec

// vector
Sorting 1000000 lists of length 10:    2888354 usec
Sorting   50000 lists of length 100:   2031675 usec
Sorting     500 lists of length 1000:  1604312 usec
Sorting       5 lists of length 10000: 1603279 usec

// iterator
Sorting 1000000 lists of length 10:    3003877 usec
Sorting   50000 lists of length 100:   4150561 usec
Sorting     500 lists of length 1000:  3829943 usec
Sorting       5 lists of length 10000: 3766683 usec

For lists of length 10 they all have about the same performance, but for arrays with length 10, iterators are nearly five times worse than C arrays. How can this be?

Edit: I re-tested it using -O3 and the effect seemed to disappear. It's good to know that I can avoid this problem using compiler optimization, but I still would like to understand this strange behavior that occurs at -O0.

// array
Sorting 1000000 lists of length 10:    802136 usec
Sorting   50000 lists of length 100:   300472 usec
Sorting     500 lists of length 1000:  185330 usec
Sorting       5 lists of length 10000: 179851 usec

// vector
Sorting 1000000 lists of length 10:    955003 usec
Sorting   50000 lists of length 100:   302232 usec
Sorting     500 lists of length 1000:  185034 usec
Sorting       5 lists of length 10000: 181459 usec


// iterator
Sorting 1000000 lists of length 10:    811077 usec
Sorting   50000 lists of length 100:   230852 usec
Sorting     500 lists of length 1000:  112885 usec
Sorting       5 lists of length 10000: 105739 usec

I compiled in GCC with either -O0 or -O3 and used no other compiler flags.

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4  
Post your benchmark code. And also tell us, is it Debug or Release build? Or, in GCC, have you used optimizations flag such as -O4? –  Nawaz May 1 '13 at 5:10
3  
Are optimizations turned on? –  Jesse Good May 1 '13 at 5:11
2  
You didn't turn on optimizations, so the first set of benchmarks is moot. The second set of benchmarks seems normal to me. –  Mysticial May 1 '13 at 5:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

With no optimizations, the biggest difference probably comes from calling functions like operator[]. When functions are called there is a lot that happens which causes overhead, and is especially significant when called in loops. However, with optimizations turned on, all these function calls are inlined which is why you see the difference disappear. Note that any compiler nowadays should give you almost equivalent performance whether you use std::vector or a plain array.

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