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It seems that in SQL Server, unique indexes treat NULLs as 'just another value' instead of like in the rest of SQL where comparisons against NULL return NULL.

Say you've got a table (t) with a unique index on a nullable column K:

K     V
0     32
1     12
3     45

All good.

But it will also allow

K     V
0     32
1     12
3     45
NULL  89     <-- Baaad

And vice versa, it will also allow the following:

K     V
NULL  89
0     32    <-- not good

I can see this is could be a potential disaster as I'm using NULLs key values to represent values where no further break down is possible - having a total and a breakdown leads to double counting or inconsistency.

I can find seemingly thousands of questions where where people want to do the opposite (allow multiple NULLs), but none that want to treat NULLs as NULLs.


How can I get SQL Server to treat NULLs as NULLs (and only allow one NULL or any number of unique values in a column) in a unique index?

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2  
I'm not clear on what behavior you're actually looking for. You use the phrase "treat NULLs as NULLs" as if it should be obvious, just from the phrase, but for me, it's not. I also find your second example unclear. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever May 1 '13 at 6:23
2  
SQL-Server allows maximum of one NULL in a column with a unique constraint. The other DBMS (that go with the standard in this case) allow more than one Nulls. You can bypass that by making a unique partial index but I don't think this is your goal. It's not at all clear what your goal is actually. –  ypercube May 1 '13 at 6:26
    
Well in my mind any comparison with NULL should yield a NULL, therefore if a column contains but one NULL all comparisons against any other value (including NULL) should fail. I can see how it it might be useful to be 'optimistic' and assume the NULLs represent unknowns that are unique, but in my case it would be pesimistic and ensure the integrity of the database. –  Fowl May 1 '13 at 10:10
1  
According to the standard, comparison with NULL yields UNKNOWN, not NULL. It's a minor nit, but if we had a "boolean" data type in SQL, we'd expect to be able to set a column of that type to TRUE, FALSE, UNKNOWN or (if it was nullable) NULL. Only (So far as I'm aware) MySQL conflates NULL and UNKNOWN. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever May 1 '13 at 10:19
    
I use MS SQL, I don't know anything about standards :P Seriously though, I think lots of docs oversimplify NULL handling to the point where they leave you with an incomplete mental model. –  Fowl May 1 '13 at 10:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If Andomar's interpretation of what you want is correct, it may be doable if you have a table that already contains all possible K values:

create table dbo.T (
    K int null,
    V int not null,
)
go
create table dbo.PossibleKs (
    K int not null
)
insert into dbo.PossibleKs (K) values (0),(1),(2)
go
create view dbo.TV
with schemabinding
as
    select pk.K
    from
        dbo.T t
            inner join
        dbo.PossibleKs pk
            on
                t.K = pk.K or
                t.K is null
GO
create unique clustered index IX_TV on dbo.TV (K)

And your test cases:

insert into dbo.T(K,V) values
(0,     32),
(1,     12),
(3,     45)
go
insert into dbo.T(K,V) values
(NULL,89)
--Msg 2601, Level 14, State 1, Line 1
--Cannot insert duplicate key row in object 'dbo.TV' with unique index 'IX_TV'. The duplicate key value is (0).
--The statement has been terminated.
go
delete from dbo.T
go
insert into dbo.T(K,V) values
(NULL,89)
go
insert into dbo.T(K,V) values
(0,     32)
--Msg 2601, Level 14, State 1, Line 1
--Cannot insert duplicate key row in object 'dbo.TV' with unique index 'IX_TV'. The duplicate key value is (0).
--The statement has been terminated.
share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting creative use of indexed views. This looks like it will work. Thank you! –  Fowl May 1 '13 at 10:17

So you want either one null or any amount of unique numbers. I don't think that can reliably be enforced using constraints.

You could possibly use a trigger. The trigger will have to answer questions like: are you updating a row to null? Is there already a row that is null? Are you updating a row that already was null? That trigger will be complex and hard to maintain.

You could manipulate the table using stored procedures. The stored procedures could do the update/insert/delete operations in a transaction. Before committing, they could check if the table consists of one null or any number of other values. You could reasonably maintain that.

At the end of the day, your design imposes unusual constraints that are hard to implement. Perhaps you could revisit the design.

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Yes a trigger would be suboptimal. :) I don't think my design is that unusual actually, it's just removing one tiny bit of flexibility that would greatly increase the complexity of my queries to handle correctly in all cases. This way guarantees that that "trivial" query works correctly. –  Fowl May 1 '13 at 10:18

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