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I am writing an FTP program that requires Blowfish encryption between a big endian computer and a little endian computer. Here is the code I am using to do the encryption. As you can see, it takes into account Endianness already in the code. The problem is that when I encrypt on one machine then decrypt on a machine of different endianness the result is wrong.

Currently I am simply writing the encrypted string to file, then reading it in on the other machine (shared memory) for a simple test case.

Here are the two helper methods I created (fairly strait forward):

      //Encrypts string and return encrpted string
void encrypt(Blowfish* BF, unsigned char* whatToEncrypt, int size, unsigned char* encryptionKey){

  char* tmp = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*(PASSWORD_LENGTH+1));
  memcpy(tmp, encryptionKey, (PASSWORD_LENGTH+1));

   //Set BF Password
    BF->Set_Passwd((char*)tmp);

    BF->Encrypt((void *)whatToEncrypt, size);

 }

 //decrypts enrypted string and returns a string
void decrypt(Blowfish* BF, unsigned char* whatToDecrypt, int size, unsigned char* encryptionKey){

  char* tmp = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*(PASSWORD_LENGTH+1));
  memcpy(tmp, encryptionKey, (PASSWORD_LENGTH+1));

  //Set BF Password
   BF->Set_Passwd(tmp);

  //decrypt
  BF->Decrypt((void *)whatToDecrypt, size);
}

Machine 1 code:

int main(){
  Blowfish BF;

  unsigned char* test = new unsigned char[8];
  for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++){
    test[i] = 'a'+i;
  }

  unsigned char* test_key = new unsigned char[9];
  for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++){
    test_key[i] = 'f';
  }
  test_key[8] = '\0';

  cout << "test: " << test<<endl; 
  encrypt(&BF, test, 8, test_key);
  cout << "test: " << test<<endl; 

  FILE* in = fopen("example.txt", "w");
  for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++){
    fputc(test[i], in);
  }
  fclose(in);

}

Machine 2 code:

int main(){

  FILE* in = fopen("example.txt", "r");
  Blowfish BF;

  unsigned char* test = new unsigned char[9];
  for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++){
    test[i] = fgetc(in);
  }
  test[8] = '\0';

  fclose(in);

  unsigned char* test_key = new unsigned char[9];
  for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++){
    test_key[i] = 'f';
  }
  test_key[8] = '\0';

 cout << "test: " << test<<endl;  
  decrypt(&BF,test, 8, test_key);
  cout << "test: " << test<<endl; 
}

As you can see, the key is hard coded in so it is the same, but the output is still wrong. I have tried manually assigning the WordByte in every combination (in blowfish.h) between the two machines with no luck.

share|improve this question
    
First figure out which endianness is broken by comparing with a known good implementation or published test-vectors. –  CodesInChaos May 1 '13 at 10:35
1  
I'd switch to a different implementation entirely. That code is pretty ugly. Unions, using int with the implicit assumption that it's 32 bit, calling the key "password" (using a password as a key directly is a really bad idea) –  CodesInChaos May 1 '13 at 10:39
1  
Try adding 'b' to your file mode ("rb" and "wb"). This will open the file in binary mode. Writing in text mode (when not text) could be causing your problems. Otherwise unless you are using Unicode your chars are 8-bits and endianess does not even factor in as an issue. –  Charlie May 1 '13 at 12:05

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