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normally, strlen() does not count the null terminator at the end of the string. But, below code prints the string count with the null terminator. Can anyone explain me why? Thanks

char str2[100];
printf("\nEnter a string: ");
fgets (str2, sizeof(str2), stdin);
printf("\n%d",strlen(str2));
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10  
It's probably counting the \n rather than the \0 – Roger Rowland May 1 '13 at 7:42
    
So what string did you enter, and what was the result? – Tony The Lion May 1 '13 at 7:42
    
possible duplicate of fgets() adds newline at the end – Karoly Horvath May 1 '13 at 7:45
    
Roger Rowland is correct. "A newline character makes fgets stop reading, but it is considered a valid character by the function and included in the string copied to str." from cplusplus.com/reference/cstdio/fgets – Jimbo May 1 '13 at 7:47

I am assuming the preceding fgets prompt picked up the character.

For example:

You put in 'apple'.

Internally your string was stored as 'apple\n\0'.

strlen then returned 6 for 'apple' + '\n'

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1  
Nice explanation. Welcome to SO! – luser droog May 1 '13 at 7:47
1  
Thanks @luserdroog :) – Arxo Clay May 2 '13 at 7:22

Here you have used fgets() function to take input. When you take input by fgets() function then an additional new line character('\n') will be added with your sting. suppose your input is : "hello" . after typing this sting you must press ENTER key for which new line character will be added with your string. Hence its seems to you that strlen() counts the null terminator. But if you take input using scanf() function it will not add additional new line character('\n') when ENTER is pressed. So you will see the exact number of character you string contains. Run the following code to see my explanation.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>

void main()
{
char str2[100];
printf("\nEnter a string: ");
scanf("%s",str2);
//fgets (str2, sizeof(str2), stdin);
printf("\n%d",strlen(str2));
}   
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The fgets() function accepts the input when a newline character(Enter key when using stdin) is encountered, and the newline character \n is considered a valid character by the function and included in the string copied to your str2.Hence when you pass it as a parameter to strlen() it gives one more than the original number of characters in your string to account for the additional \n character.

If you want the original number of characters or don't want a \n to be added, use the gets() function as it doesn't copy the newline character.And further, you only need to pass the string as argument,no need to pass the stream (stdin) as the default stream for gets() is stdin.

char str2[100];
printf("\nEnter a string: ");
gets(str2);
printf("\n%d",strlen(str2));
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fgets read until \n is encountered so if user entered anshul then str2 will containanshul\n\0so strlen to it will return 7 char as strlen computer until it find NULL('\0') character.

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