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Im trying to make a matrix filled with O chars, but Im new to classes. When trying to run I get the following error:

error: unexpected unqualified-id before '.' token.

Im doing something wrong with the class, but I cannot find out what. Anybody has an idea?

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class field
    {

private:

public:
    char** the_field;
    int i, j;
    char**  create_field(void);
    void    print_field();

    };

////////// CREATE THE FIELD //////////

  char** field::create_field(void) //define member function
   {

        for(int i = 0; i < 14; i++)
        {
            the_field[i] = new char [14];

            for(int j = 0; j < 14; j++)
            {
                the_field[i][j] = 'O';
            }
        }
        return the_field;
   }
//////////// PRINT THE FIELD //

    void field::print_field()
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < 14; ++i)
        {
            for(int j = 0; j < 14; ++j)
            {
                cout << " " << the_field[i][j] << " ";
            }
 //             putchar('\n');
            cout<<"\n";
        }
    }

int main()
{
//declare objects with type field
field create_field; //declare create_field as type of field
field print_field;
int i, j;

field.create_field();
field.print_field();

 return 0;
 }
share|improve this question
6  
don't waste our time, the error message states the line number where the error occurs, please point us to that line. –  stdcall May 1 '13 at 8:32
1  
Besides the compiler error, you have a more serious run-time error. You don't actually allocate the_field, so accessing the_field[i] will is undefined behavior and may lead to a crash. Unless you are required to use pointers, you should use std::vector or possible std::array. –  Joachim Pileborg May 1 '13 at 8:34
    
thank you, it indeed gives a run-time error now. I will look in to it. –  user1876088 May 1 '13 at 8:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There are lots of problems in your code:

  • If you create something with new, you have to call also delete on that object
  • the_field should be private
  • you don't need to define i and j in the class, because they are defined in the for loop already
  • you are ignoring what does the create_field() method returns
  • the size of the grid is not dynamic (use width and height in simialr situations)
  • the_field is pointer to a pointer (2D array in your case), but you are creating just the columns (the rows have to be created also)
  • ...

I have fixed it for you, please try it.

    #include <iostream>

    using namespace std;


    class field
    {
    private:
        char** the_field;
        int width;
        int height;

    public:
        // constructor
        field(int w, int h);

        // destructor
        ~field();

        // method
        void print();
    };



    field::field(int w, int h)
    {
        width = w;
        height = h;

        the_field = new char*[width];
        for (int i=0; i<width; i++)
        {
            the_field[i] = new char[height];
            for (int j=0; j<height; j++)
            {
                the_field[i][j] = 'O';
            }
        }
    }


    field::~field()
    {
        for (int i=0; i<width; i++)
            delete[] the_field[i];

        delete[] the_field;
    }


    void field::print()
    {
        for(int i=0; i < width; i++)
        {
            for(int j=0; j < height; j++)
            {
                cout << " " << the_field[i][j] << " ";
            }
            cout << "\n";
        }
    }



    int main()
    {
        field* myfield = new field(14, 14);
        myfield->print();
        delete myfield;

        return 0;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I learned a lot from your code, it has a really clear structrure. really helpfull. Thanks for the effort! It made the tutorials I read a lot more clear. –  user1876088 May 1 '13 at 10:07
    
If you are really satisfied, don't forget to upvote and accept the answer, so the others will notice the right answer easily. –  Zoltan Tirinda May 1 '13 at 10:17
    
Ok, didnt know about the answer button. I will upvote your answer as soon as I have enough reputation points to be allowed to do so :p thanks again! –  user1876088 May 1 '13 at 13:24

How many fields are there? I think you want one field, but you have declared two. I think you want this

field my_field;

my_field.create_field();
my_field.print_field();

BTW I think you'd agree that this code would read better if your member functions were called create and print. Generally I don't think it's a good idea to name your member functions after the class they are part of.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you! That is indeed way more logic –  user1876088 May 1 '13 at 8:42

You are using the class name. '.' operator is used for objects of class to access their attributes. If you do : field obj;
obj.create_field();

then you will not have a problem. 'unqualified id' means you did not give it a valid identifier. And u did not, because u used the class name instead of an identifier for an object.

share|improve this answer
field.create_field();

Should be

create_field.create_field();

etc.

share|improve this answer
field create_field; //declare create_field as type of field
field print_field;

You're creating two variables of type field, whose names are the same as member functions of the field class. While percfectly legal, it's very confusing, and probably not what you intended.

field.create_field();
field.print_field();

This is incorrect code, as non-static member functions must be called on an instance of the class, but you're trying to call them directly on the class. You could do that if they were static, but then you'd have to use :: instead of ..

This probably wouldn't be what you want, though. I assume you wanted to create one field object and then call the member functions on it. The code for that would be:

field fieldInstance;
fieldInstance.create_field();
fieldInstance.print_field();

Side notes about design:

  • It's generally a good idea to follow the principle of encapsulation with classes. This means data members shouldn't be public, they should be hidden under accessors.

  • There's little reason to repeat the class name in member function names - they're part of the class in the first place.

  • It's usually a bad idea to separate object creation from its initialisation. The code of create_field() would be better as the constructor for field.

  • It's best to avoid manual memory allocation in C++ if possible. Generally, using std::vector is far superior to manually allocating dynamic arrays.

  • When creating print functionality, it's a good idea to pass in a stream object, so that you can easily redirect the printing.

In summary, I would design your class like this:

class field
{
    std::vector<std::vector<char> > the_field;

public:
    field();
    const std::vector<std::vector<char> >& getField() const { return the_field; }
    void print(std::ostream &stream) const;
}

field::field() :
    the_field(14, std::vector<char>(14, 'O'))
{}

void field::print(std::ostream &stream) const
{
    for (size_t i = 0; i < the_field.size(); ++i) {
        for (size_t j = 0; j < the_field[i].size(); ++j) {
            stream << ' ' << the_field[i][j] << ' ';
        }
        stream << '\n';
    }
}

Of course, the getFied() functio is actually a bit too powerful, returning a direct reference to the data. It would be better to provide a semantics-based interface tailored to your class' intended use - perhaps char get(size_t i, size_t j) const.

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