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I have a sequence of numbers in a list and I'm looking for an elegant solution, preferably list comprehension, to get the individual sequences (including single values). I have solved this small problem but it is not very pythonic.

The following list defines an input sequence:

input = [1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 10, 11, 12, 17]

The desired output should be:

output = [
  [1, 2, 3, 4],
  [8],
  [10, 11, 12],
  [17],
]
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marked as duplicate by jamylak, Martijn Pieters, Shawn Chin, interjay, Anand May 1 '13 at 11:26

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Could there be two identical numbers in a row, i.e, [1,2,2,3,5]? –  Haidro May 1 '13 at 9:02
    
No, all numbers are unique and n + 1 will always be greater than n. –  skovsgaard May 1 '13 at 9:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Pythonic means simple, straightforward code, and not one-liners.

def runs(seq):
    result = []
    for s in seq:
        if not result or s != result[-1][-1] + 1:
            # Start a new run if we can't continue the previous one.
            result.append([])
        result[-1].append(s)
    return result

print runs([1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 10, 11, 12, 17])
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>>> from itertools import groupby, count
>>> nums = [1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 10, 11, 12, 17]
>>> [list(g) for k, g in groupby(nums, key=lambda n, c=count(): n - next(c))]
[[1, 2, 3, 4], [8], [10, 11, 12], [17]]
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1  
Can you see into the future? That's just... amazing. –  Haidro May 1 '13 at 8:46
1  
It works - but it's not really self-explaining code. –  Howard May 1 '13 at 8:47
3  
@HennyH: No, c is a counter, so it gives each element in the list an index (0, 1, etc.) then groups values on the difference between their index and their actual value. [1, 2, 3, 4] all differ from their index by 1, [8] differs from it's index by 4, etc. –  Martijn Pieters May 1 '13 at 8:53
1  
I found this blog post showing off this technique. And an earlier reference to it on CodeReview. –  Martijn Pieters May 1 '13 at 10:06
1  
@jamylak: And the original commit for the example credits Guido with the idea, and was made in 2004. –  Martijn Pieters May 1 '13 at 10:40

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