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I need to override toString() method for all of the concrete method of my abstract class - exactly the same in all cases. So here is what I want to do (SomeEnum is a separate class which has just an enum declaration):

abstract class

public abstract class ClassA {
    protected SomeEnum name;
    protected int some_int;

// Constructor here

@Override
public String toString() {
    return name.toString().toLowerCase() + " > " + Integer.toString(some_int);
}
}

concrete class (example)

public class ClassB extends ClassA {
    private static final int some_const = 1;
    private SomeEnum name = SomeEnum.ENUM_1;

public ClassB(int some_int) {
    super(some_const, some_int);
}
}

For some reason I cannot do it that way without runtime exceptions and I need to declare abstract method in the abstract class and then provide (exactly the same) implementation of toString() in every of the concrete classes implementations.

What is wrong with this approach?

EDIT: The exception I get is NullPointerException that then points me to ClassA.toString().

share|improve this question
    
We can't tell, without knowing what compiler errors you're getting. Please show a short but complete example demonstrating the problem, and include the compiler error. –  Jon Skeet May 1 '13 at 8:53
    
It looks odd that you've shadowed the name field in your subclass. Is that intentional? –  Duncan May 1 '13 at 8:55
    
@JonSkeet I'll provide more details shortly. –  REACHUS May 1 '13 at 8:58
    
@Duncan It's intentional but if its unnecessary, let me know. –  REACHUS May 1 '13 at 8:59
    
Well, see Kevin's answer/comment below to see what you could do instead. It's not the cause of your problem, I don't think. But then again, nothing you've described so far should cause compiler errors. –  Duncan May 1 '13 at 8:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of declaring name as a field on ClassB assign someEnum in the constructor of ClassB so it uses the field from the supertype. The supertype does not have access to the name field on the subtype, which causes the NPE when toString is called.

public ClassB(int some_int) {
    super(some_const, some_int);
    this.name = SomeEnum.ENUM_1;
}

Full Example

ClassB

public class ClassB extends ClassA {
    private static final int some_const = 1;

    public ClassB(int some_int) {
        super(some_const, some_int);
        this.name = SomeEnum.ENUM_1;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ClassB b = new ClassB(4);
        b.toString();
    }
}

ClassA

public abstract class ClassA {
    protected SomeEnum name;
    protected int some_int;

    public ClassA(int someConst, int some_int2) {
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return name.toString().toLowerCase() + " > "
                + Integer.toString(some_int);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is a valid point to make (perhaps as a comment?), but I don't believe not doing this would cause compiler errors. –  Duncan May 1 '13 at 9:00
    
@DuncanJones The code in the OP throws a NPE since the field name is null in the abstract class and the supertype cannot reference the name field which is assigned in the subtype. –  Kevin Bowersox May 1 '13 at 9:02
    
The joy of truly understanding what the OP wants! Looks like your answer is correct, good spot! –  Duncan May 1 '13 at 9:02
    
@DuncanJones I keep my IDE open when Stacking, it pays! Thanks! –  Kevin Bowersox May 1 '13 at 9:03
    
Great, thanks for helping me learn OOP! –  REACHUS May 1 '13 at 9:06

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