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In my program I have a class called Cell, defined like so:

public class Cell {
    private int x;
    private int y;

    public Cell (int x, int y) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals (Object o) {
        boolean result = false;
        if (o instanceof Cell) {
            Cell other = (Cell) o;
            result = (this.x == other.x && this.y == other.y)
        }
        return result;
    }

    @Override        
    public int hashCode() {
        int result = x;
        result = 31 * result + y;
        return result;
    }
}

I have a Grid class, like so (many methods cut out and variable names simplified):

public class Grid {
    private Set<Cell> cellArray;

    public Grid() {
        cellArray = new HashSet<Cell>();
    }

    public Set<Cell> getCellArray() {
        return cellArray;
    }

    public void addCellArray(Cell cell) {
        cellArray.add(cell)
    }
}

In my main body of code, I take in a grid object, like so:

public class Controller {
    private Grid grid;
    public Controller (Grid grid) (
        this.grid = grid;

Then, I have a series of loops that look like this:

private set<Cell> cellArray = grid.getCellArray();

boolean endLoop = false;
 do {
    x = randomGenerator.nextInt(10);
    y = randomGenerator.nextInt(10);

    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
        if (cellArray.contains(new Cell(x, y+i))) {
            continue;
        }
    }
    for (int j = 0; j < length; j++) {
        cellArray.add(new Cell(x, y+i));
    }
    endLoop = true;
} while(!endLoop);

I'm aware it's a very messy, with too much instantiation going on (and if anyone has pointers to make it cleaner, feel free to point them out) - however, the main issue is the fact that the first for loop is meant to check if the cellArray contains the items - it doesn't seem to be doing this.

There's no error message, no null pointer or anything like that. I've tried debugging it and have seen it compare two cells with identical x and y values, without proceeding to the continue statement to start the do while loop again.

I am assuming this is because even though they have identical values, they are different 'objects' and so aren't coming back as equal.

How could I fix this and get them to equate to one another if their values are the same?

share|improve this question
    
private set<Cell> cellArray = Grid.getCellArray();..getCellArray is not static within Grid class. This will show compile time error. –  Vishal K May 1 '13 at 10:16
    
Why would it need to be static? I'm not getting any compile time errors. –  Andrew Martin May 1 '13 at 10:17
    
How can you call non-static method of a class without creating its instance? –  Vishal K May 1 '13 at 10:18
    
Apologies - I see what you meant. I've cut out A LOT of code for brevity. I do have an instance of it in the constructor of this class (which acts as a controller). I'll edit my question now to reflect that. –  Andrew Martin May 1 '13 at 10:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your continue statement continues the inner for-loop (which is quite useless here). You probably want to continue the outer loop: continue outerLoop;, with the label outerLoop: put in front of do {.

As the Java API states, the contains method should rely on your equals method, so object equality should work as you expect it.

share|improve this answer
    
That's ticket. Had no idea you could label loops. Now, to tidy up the damn code. Thanks! –  Andrew Martin May 1 '13 at 10:29

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