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I am trying to implement modular design in an asp.net project dividing the application into different modules like HR, Inventory Management System etc. Since I am trying to keep different modules independent of each other, I separated these modules in such a way that each module is a separate Visual studio solution having UI, BLL, DAL and even a separate database schema.

Up till now I thought this as a common practice for developing Management systems and ERPs but I am searching the web for last three days but hardly found any help full stuff regarding developing modular applications. Most of what I found is mere theory explaining the concepts of cohesion and coupling but not real world scenarios. So I wonder

  1. Is it the right approach of separating modules?
  2. How the real world modular applications are developed?
  3. How should the different modules communicate with each other yet they stay independent of each other.
  4. I think there should be a core application which makes use of these modules, how should the core application communicate with these modules?
  5. There is some data, entities , objects which are common to each module, should I put them in the core modules in order for other modules to use them (I think this will make the modules coupled to core) or should every modules maintain its own copy of data + define those object, (which I think voilates DRY)

Any thoughts, links are warmly welcome.

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Sounds like you might be ready for a messaging based solution. Perhaps read the book Enterprise Integration Patterns and look at NServiceBus. –  MattDavey May 1 '13 at 10:23
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A key question here is whether or not your separate components are merely distinctions in functionality within a single ASP.NET application, or distinct projects in their own right with their own lifecycles and deployment schedules. Is this all going to be deployed as a single website? –  MattDavey May 1 '13 at 10:38
    
@MattDavey yes it will be deployed as a single website.. what I want to achieve is suppose if a customer wants core application with module x and another customer wants the core application without module x, as a service provider I should be be to switch the modules on or off –  ZedBee May 1 '13 at 10:49
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ah, in that case it may be that this is not an architectural question at all. In that scenario, feature toggles could be used to deliver different functionality to different clients. –  MattDavey May 1 '13 at 12:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is a personal opinion and is debatable.

I separated these modules in such a way that each module is a separate Visual studio solution having UI, BLL, DAL and even a separate database schema.

Sounds like a total overkill. Abstraction over abstraction makes your application pain in the neck to maintain, support, and enhance. Is it that large that you need to separate modules into separate solutions?

Is it the right approach of separating modules?

No, I think it is a total over-engineering. I would suggest using projects to separate modules. And not separate solutions. The problem with solution is that it will require external dependencies management tool, which requires a lot of effort to bring in and later maintain.

How the real world modular applications are developed?

Using abstraction (interfaces and abstract classes) and separate projects.

How should the different modules communicate with each other yet they stay independent of each other.

By using interfaces, DI, IOC, TDD

I think there should be a core application which makes use of these modules, how should the core application communicate with these modules?

Core does not communicate with modules. In fact it should ideally not depend on any other project/library. This makes it simple to reference and use in large solutions.

There is some data, entities , objects which are common to each module, should I put them in the core modules in order for other modules to use them (I think this will make the modules coupled to core) or should every modules maintain its own copy of data + define those object, (which I think voilates DRY)

I would highly recommend using a single copy from the Core project. See this questions for details of why.

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+1 with the caveat that a lot of these points only apply up to medium sized, single application projects. We can't be sure exactly how large the OP's project is. –  MattDavey May 1 '13 at 10:31
    
Thanks a lot for such detailed reply. Suppose if I divide the modules into projects instead of solution how should I organize the UI, BLL and DAL? I currently implemented BLL and DAL Class Library Projects and UI as asp.net project. –  ZedBee May 1 '13 at 11:01
    
@ZedBee yeah, this is what I'd exactly do –  oleksii May 1 '13 at 11:13
    
How should I keep separate UI, BLL, DAL for each module. –  ZedBee May 1 '13 at 11:22
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I think those are invalid points. Cannot see any performance problem, unless the code uses singletons combined with multithreading extensively. Introducing copies of the classes is a hell to maintain. A single point of failure does not apply here, as it is more to do with the nodes in a network. In fact it is good to know if a single line change in a core file for some reason breaks BL or DAL tests. You can keep track of all the changes and their impact on the whole system. –  oleksii May 1 '13 at 11:41

This is one of those topics that is entirely subjective for the most part, but you may wish to consider a SOA (Service Oriented Architecture).

Using SOA, you can define a service (for this example, I'll stick to web services, though other service types exist depending on requirements) for each business area - an HR web service, a projects web service, a finance web service and so forth.

You can then bring all these together with a front end system that will communicate with and utilise these services, that would normally be your core application, though depending on your needs and requirements you may opt for multiple front end systems.

For the front end system I would recommend using ASP.NET MVC which has the concept of areas and will let you separate the front end into specific areas - an HR area, a projects area, a finance area and so forth that will contain the models and views for each specific area.

Doing this will let you build in a modular manner, you can build your first web service, say, the HR web service, that has methods for getting relevant HR data and so forth, and then build the HR area of your MVC application. Expanding then simply depends on building the web service, and creating the front end in the MVC application. There is nothing stopping say the HR area then accessing the finance web service if it needs finance information, but it still keeps everything in distinct independent modules.

Using this method can also be helpful in aiding future interoperability - it may be that other systems in the company will find it useful to interact with certain web services. For example, in a previous role it was useful for the companies engineering software to integrate with the projects team web service as it allowed for engineering related information to be linked to it's related project.

If the system grows in terms of resource requirements it should also be fairly scalable as it is trivial to say, offload the projects web service to another service if it starts eating a lot of system resources. It also allows you to switch modules out if need be - if you ever decided to move to say, a Linux/Java platform, you could trivially move by porting module by module with no real interruption of the overall system.

But of course, as I say, this is simply one such option and much of it depends on the specifics of your circumstances.

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+1 I get the feeling that this might be closer to what the OP needs. However web services are not the only way to achieve this - message queuing solutions are often preferable. –  MattDavey May 1 '13 at 10:41
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Indeed, and for the benefit of ZedBee it's probably worth noting that in that case he may want to look at WCF for providing his services as that offers him a fairly flexible way of using different technologies like MSMQ if that better suits his needs than web services do. –  Xefan May 1 '13 at 10:49
    
@Xefan thanks a lot.. I will definitely look into SOA –  ZedBee May 1 '13 at 11:20

It is too late to answer but it seems interesting.

Since I am trying to keep different modules independent of each other, I separated these modules in such a way that each module is a separate Visual studio solution having UI, BLL, DAL and even a separate database schema.

It depends on your scale of application. If you create a very small-simple application with a little functionality, then it is safe to has a combined assembly. Or if you want, just separate the UI with other module. At least it can help you to emphasize SOC. Keep in mind that loading multiple assembly can be slower than a single assembly.

Is it the right approach of separating modules?

Module separation always has a drawback, that it is require mapping. It means slower performance in general (maybe negligible, but still there is), and slower development time. If your application will be large and complex enough, it is worth it, since you can create modular unit tests for each module.

How the real world modular applications are developed?

No exact practice though, every problem needs a solution. You won't need a heavy multi-threading or dependency injection architecture for a simple calculator application.

How should the different modules communicate with each other yet they stay independent of each other.

Using interface. You can make the implementation different later on. Example is, you currently use C# Winform for your application, communicate to the BLL using interface. Later on, you want to migrate to ASP.Net, then you just change the implementation, but keep the interface to communicate with the BLL the same.

I think there should be a core application which makes use of these modules, how should the core application communicate with these modules?

There is some data, entities , objects which are common to each module, should I put them in the core modules in order for other modules to use them (I think this will make the modules coupled to core) or should every modules maintain its own copy of data + define those object, (which I think voilates DRY)

I assume it is an enterprise level application which share the same modules / data such as employee. If it is really need to behave uniformly, then you should provide the very basic logic at the core Level. At the application / implementation level, you may has different implementation to fulfill each requirement.

Do not force to uniform all of the business logic to the core. If a specific application need a different implementation, it is hard to make the core configurable.

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Thanks Fendy.. :) –  ZedBee May 2 '13 at 10:45

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