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I'm trying do understand the lifecycle of Fragment.

I have a MainActivity, with a layout including two FrameLayout to load Fragments, one for a top bar with a vertical menu, another one for the content.

When I start the app, an instance of HomeFragment is loaded in the content FrameLayout container. Then when I click on a button in the menu, an instance of SomeFragment replaces it.

When on the SomeFragment content, I click on the device's Home button, and all the visible Fragment (i.e. the TopBarFragment and the SomeFragment) are destroyed and detached from the MainActivity, i.e. onDestroyView, onDestroy and onDetach are called for both.

Now when I restart the app, the TopBarFragment and the SomeFragment are created and destroyed (full lifecycle from onAttach to onDetach) and then the TopBarFragment and the HomeFragment are created, as expected from the code in the MainActivity's onCreate.

Why are the TopBarFragment and the SomeFragment, i.e. the latest visible Fragment before clicking on the device's Home button, recreated and destroyed before executing what's in the MainActivity's onCreate?

Note: in order to test my app I checked the option Don't keep activities in my device's developer options.

MainActivity.java

public class MainActivity extends FragmentActivity {

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {

        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);     

        setContentView(R.layout.main);      

        FragmentTransaction fragmentTransaction = getSupportFragmentManager().beginTransaction();

        Fragment homeFragment = new HomeFragment();
        fragmentTransaction.replace(R.id.content_container, homeFragment, "");

        Fragment topBarFragment = new TopBarFragment();
        fragmentTransaction.replace(R.id.top_bar_container, topBarFragment, "top_bar_fragment");

        fragmentTransaction.commit();
    }
}

main.xml

<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent" >

    <FrameLayout
        android:id="@+id/content_container"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="match_parent"
        android:paddingTop="44dp" />

    <FrameLayout
        android:id="@+id/top_bar_container"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="match_parent"
        android:clipChildren="false" />

</RelativeLayout>

TopBarFragment.java

public class TopBarFragment extends Fragment{   

    private int mSelectedMenuOption = 0;

    private LinearLayout mVerticalMenu;

    private Boolean mMenuIsOpen = true;

    private ImageButton btn_01, btn_02; // there are more


    @Override
    public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container, Bundle savedInstanceState) {

        return inflater.inflate(R.layout.top_bar, container, false);
    }

    @Override
    public void onActivityCreated (Bundle savedInstanceState){

        super.onActivityCreated(savedInstanceState);

        btn_01 = (ImageButton) getView().findViewById(R.id.btn_01);
        btn_02 = (ImageButton) getView().findViewById(R.id.btn_02);

        btn_01.setOnClickListener(mButtonClickListener);
        btn_02.setOnClickListener(mButtonClickListener);

        mVerticalMenu = (LinearLayout) getView().findViewById(R.id.vertical_menu);

        toggleMenu(0);

        Button btn_menu = (Button) getView().findViewById(R.id.btn_menu);
        btn_menu.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(View v) {

                // toggle vertical menu             

            }
        });
    }


    private OnClickListener mButtonClickListener = new OnClickListener()
    {

        @Override
        public void onClick(View v) {

            /* ... */

            if(!v.isSelected()){

                FragmentTransaction fragmentTransaction = getActivity().getSupportFragmentManager().beginTransaction();

                switch(v.getId()){

                case R.id.btn_01:

                    Fragment homeFragment = new HomeFragment();     
                    fragmentTransaction.replace(R.id.content_container,homeFragment, "");
                    fragmentTransaction.commit();

                    break;

                case R.id.btn_02:

                    Fragment someFragment = new SomeFragment();     
                    fragmentTransaction.replace(R.id.content_container, someFragment, "");
                    fragmentTransaction.commit();

                    break;      
                }
            }
        }
    };    
}

SomeFragment

public class SomeFragment extends Fragment{

    @Override
    public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container, Bundle savedInstanceState) {

        ((TopBarFragment)getActivity().getSupportFragmentManager().findFragmentByTag("top_bar_fragment")).setSelectedButton(1);

        return inflater.inflate(R.layout.some_fragment, container, false);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure but isn't the Don't keep activities option supposed to simulate an Activity that goes to the background and it gets killed there due to memory constraints? If this is the case(and I run a simple test) then the behavior you see its quite normal as the FragmentManager of the Activity(the Activity needs to restore its state) will still have references(and will try to bring those fragments to life) to the old instances present when the activity ended up in the background. –  Luksprog May 1 '13 at 15:42
    
Ok, so even if they are killed, the whole lifecycle is done just because of a reference to them? Isn't it useless? –  jul May 1 '13 at 18:22
    
It's not just a reference, the Activity gets destroyed in the background but the state is saved(including the fragments) so the activity could recreate itself(along with the last stored fragments). –  Luksprog May 1 '13 at 18:38

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