Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following table

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `test`.`foo`;
CREATE TABLE  `test`.`foo` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `name` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY  (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

Then I try to get records based on the primary key

SELECT * FROM foo f where f.id IN (2, 3, 1);

I then get the following result

+----+--------+
| id | name   |
+----+--------+
|  1 | first  |
|  2 | second |
|  3 | third  |
+----+--------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

As one can see, the result is ordered by id. What I'm trying to achieve is to get the results ordered in the sequence I'm providing in the query. Given this example it should return

+----+--------+
| id | name   |
+----+--------+
|  2 | second |
|  3 | third  |
|  1 | first  |
+----+--------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)
share|improve this question
    
Check this answer on the MySQL site: forums.mysql.com/read.php?97,210905,210918#msg-210918 -- I think you're going to run into trouble expecting in() to behave like this. MySQL doesn't really sort the results unless you explicitly tell it to, and you don't have anything in the data that will sort it the way you want. –  artlung Oct 27 '09 at 15:54
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 26 down vote accepted

As the other answer mentions: the query you posted has nothing about what order you'd like your results, just which results you'd like to get.

To order your results, I would use ORDER BY FIELD():

SELECT * FROM foo f where f.id IN (2, 3, 1)
ORDER BY FIELD(f.id, 2, 3, 1);

The argument list to FIELD can be variable length.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, yes, that works too. +1 –  Bill Karwin Oct 27 '09 at 15:56
    
I'd be interested to see if either method has a performance advantage in the general case of ordering rows by ID. I've always used FIELD() but I've seen a few examples of code that uses the FIND_IN_SET() method you posted. –  Ty W Oct 27 '09 at 15:59
add comment

The values in an IN() predicate are considered to be a set, and the result returned by an SQL query has no way to automatically infer order from that set.

In general, the order of any SQL query is arbitrary unless you specify an order with an ORDER BY clause.

You can use a MySQL function FIND_IN_SET() to do what you want:

SELECT * FROM foo f where f.id IN (2, 3, 1)
ORDER BY FIND_IN_SET(f.id, '2,3,1');

Note that the list argument to FIND_IN_SET() isn't a variable length list like the arguments of IN(). It has to be a string literal or a SET.


Re questions about performance: I'm curious too, so I tried both FIND_IN_SET() and FIELD() methods against my copy of the StackOverflow data:

With no index on VoteTypeId:

SELECT * FROM Votes ORDER BY FIND_IN_SET(VoteTypeId, '13,1,12,2,11,3,10,4,9,5,8,6,7');

3618992 rows in set (31.26 sec)
3618992 rows in set (29.67 sec)
3618992 rows in set (28.52 sec)

SELECT * FROM Votes ORDER BY FIELD(VoteTypeId, 13,1,12,2,11,3,10,4,9,5,8,6,7);

3618992 rows in set (37.30 sec)
3618992 rows in set (49.65 sec)
3618992 rows in set (41.69 sec)

With an index on VoteTypeId:

SELECT * FROM Votes ORDER BY FIND_IN_SET(VoteTypeId, '13,1,12,2,11,3,10,4,9,5,8,6,7');

3618992 rows in set (14.71 sec)
3618992 rows in set (14.81 sec)
3618992 rows in set (25.80 sec)

SELECT * FROM Votes ORDER BY FIELD(VoteTypeId, 13,1,12,2,11,3,10,4,9,5,8,6,7);

3618992 rows in set (19.03 sec)
3618992 rows in set (14.59 sec)
3618992 rows in set (14.43 sec)

Conclusion: with limited testing, there is no great advantage to either method.

share|improve this answer
1  
much nicer that CASE 'x' THEN 1, CASE 'y' THEN 2 for an arbitrary order column –  dnagirl Oct 27 '09 at 15:51
    
thanks for clarifying that one - i went for the other answer as FIELD with variable arguments seems more intuitive for me. but i'd also be interested in a performance comparison. –  msparer Oct 27 '09 at 16:21
    
yeah didn't think there'd be much if any difference, but thanks for the test results :) –  Ty W Oct 27 '09 at 17:32
    
interesting. so there isn't a great advantage if there's an index on VoteTypeId - without an index however FIND_IN_SET seems to be the better option ... thanks for the testing! –  msparer Oct 27 '09 at 17:34
1  
I'll add the disclaimer that I ran these tests on a Macbook with only 2GB RAM, and perhaps without adequate memory cooldown in between tests. So my margin of error might be a bit high. :-) –  Bill Karwin Oct 27 '09 at 17:48
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.