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I'm trying to test the C# parallel methods and this is my test program:

class Program
{
    static int counter;
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        counter = 0;
        Parallel.Invoke(
            () => func(1),
            () => func(2),
            () => func(3)
            );
        Console.Read();
    }


    static void func(int num)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 5;i++ )
        {
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("This is function #{0} loop. counter - {1}", num, counter));
            counter++;
        }
    }
}

What I tried to do is to have 1 static shared variable and each function instance will increase it by 1.

I expected that counter will be printed in order (1,2,3,...) But the output is surprising:

This is function #1 loop. counter - 0
This is function #1 loop. counter - 1
This is function #1 loop. counter - 2
This is function #1 loop. counter - 3
This is function #1 loop. counter - 4
This is function #3 loop. counter - 5
This is function #2 loop. counter - 1
This is function #3 loop. counter - 6
This is function #3 loop. counter - 8
This is function #3 loop. counter - 9
This is function #3 loop. counter - 10
This is function #2 loop. counter - 7
This is function #2 loop. counter - 12
This is function #2 loop. counter - 13
This is function #2 loop. counter - 14

Can anyone explain to me why this is happening?

share|improve this question
    
What is the point of using Parallel.Invoke if you want your counter to get incremented in order? Just call your func 3 times without any parallelism. – alex May 1 '13 at 11:44
10  
It's called a race condition, where multiple processes on parallel threads try to access and/or modify the same variable instance, thus leading to "unexpected" results. This is not weird behaviour, but what you should expect. – John Willemse May 1 '13 at 11:44
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that your code is not thread-safe. For example, what can happen is this:

  • function #2 gets the value of counter to use it in Console.WriteLine()
  • function #1 gets the value of counter, calls Console.WriteLine(), increments counter
  • function #1 gets the value of counter, calls Console.WriteLine(), increments counter
  • function #2 finally calls Console.WriteLine() with the old value

Also, ++ by itself is not thread-safe, so the final value may not be 15.

To fix both of these issues, you can use Interlocked.Increment():

for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    int incrementedCounter = Interlocked.Increment(ref counter);
    Console.WriteLine("This is function #{0} loop. counter - {1}", num, incrementedCounter);
}

This way, you will get the number after increment, not before, as in your original code. Also, this code still won't print the numbers in the correct order, but you can be sure that each number will be printed exactly once.

If you do want to have the numbers in the correct order, you will need to use lock:

private static readonly object lockObject = new object();

…

for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    lock (lockObject)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("This is function #{0} loop. counter - {1}", num, counter);
        counter++;
    }
}

Of course, if you do this, you won't actually get any parallelism, but I assume this is not your real code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This explains exactly what happened. – Stasel May 1 '13 at 14:19

Actually what happens - Invoke just queues up these tasks, and runtime assigns threads for these tasks, what gives alot of random element to it (which one is going to get picked up first etc).

Even msdn article states this:

This method can be used to execute a set of operations, potentially in parallel. No guarantees are made about the order in which the operations execute or whether they execute in parallel. This method does not return until each of the provided operations has completed, regardless of whether completion occurs due to normal or exceptional termination.

share|improve this answer
    
But that does not explain why does the counter behave this way. – svick May 1 '13 at 13:38

This problem looks like that many threads access the same variable. This is a problem of concurrency. You can try it:

    static object syncObj = new object();
    static void func(int num)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        {
            lock (syncObj)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(string.Format("This is function #{0} loop. counter - {1}", num, counter));
                counter++;
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

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