Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

C# 4.0 .NET 4.5 Silverlight 5 It seems weird that I cant find the solution so need some help please.

I have base class Base and derived class Child : Base. I have also helper class which has generic type to do specific work one EF entities Helper where T : EntityObject.

Child does specific work with a specific entity MyEntity : EntityObject.

So I tried:

public class Base
{
    protected Helper<EntityObject> helper;
}
public class Child : Base
{
    public Child()
    {
        helper = new Helper<MyEntity>();
    }
}

I would expect that more derived class must know about more specific generic parameter and I think that's what covariance for... But that doesn't work...

What's the 'correct' way to design class like that?

EDIT: sorry I didn't make it 100% clear why cant I achieve what I need.

a. Solution with generic Base doesn't work because user of the Base doesn't know the T type. Imagine:

public class User
{
    private Base<T> base; // this will not compile.
    public User(TypeEnum t)
    {
        if(t == TypeEnum.MyEntity) base = new Child();
...

b. Solution with Interface doesn't work because helper uses T everywhere (it is its purpose right?). Imagine it has method

public IEnumerable<T> Process(IEnumerable<T> items) { return items; }

How do I bring it up in the interface which doesn't know anything about T

share|improve this question
1  
What error are you seeing? What does "doesn't work" mean? –  Peter K. May 1 '13 at 11:50
2  
What does Helper look like? What is the relationship between MyEntity and EntityObject? –  Matthew Watson May 1 '13 at 11:52
1  
Helper class is the most important piece here –  NSGaga May 1 '13 at 11:54
    
@MatthewWatson MyEntity : EntityObject (see the question) –  Boppity Bop May 1 '13 at 12:21
    
@PeterK it doesn't compile –  Boppity Bop May 1 '13 at 12:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If Foo : Bar, that doesn't mean that Some<Foo> : Some<Bar>. There are two ways of doing what you want. The first is to make the base-type generic such that:

Base<T> where T : EntityObject {
    protected Helper<T> helper;
}
Child : Base<MyEntity> {...}

The second is to use a non-generic interface at the base-type, i.e. have

Base {
    protected IHelper helper;
}
Child : Base {...}

where in the latter case, Helper<T> : IHelper, for some non-generic IHelper to-be-defined.

As a side-note, you might find it easier to pass the value down in the constructor rather than using a protected field.

share|improve this answer
    
Marc. Neither of these solutions usable. Because if Base<T> then user of a Child does not know T (otherwise why do I need generics). In case of interface - you cannot declare methods in IHelper which uses T and the helper use them everythere (it is its purpose).... I updated my question with explantaions.. but I am sure you could see it yourself... is there a way out of it? –  Boppity Bop May 1 '13 at 12:19
    
@BoppityBop indeed those are the limitations; generics aren't a magic wand that make code do something different to what it could do ordinarily –  Marc Gravell May 1 '13 at 13:32

I think this is what you're after:

public class Base<T> where T : EntityObject
{
    protected Helper<T> helper;
}
public class Child : Base<MyEntity>
{
    public Child()
    {
        helper = new Helper<MyEntity>();
    }
}

Edit (in response to your edit): You can add a Base, use like so:

public class Base
{
    // put anything here that doesn't rely on the type of T
    // if you need things here that would rely on T, use EntityObject and have 
    // your subclasses provide new implementations using the more specific type
}
public class Base<T> : Base where T : EntityObject
{
    protected Helper<T> helper;
}
public class Child : Base<MyEntity>
{
    public Child()
    {
        helper = new Helper<MyEntity>();
    }
}
public class User
{
    private Base myBase;
    public User(TypeEnum t)
    {
        if(t == TypeEnum.MyEntity) myBase = new Child();
        ...
share|improve this answer
    
please see the EDIT. thanks –  Boppity Bop May 1 '13 at 12:21
    
@BoppityBop Updated my answer; does this fit what you need? If not, I'm having trouble understanding how you'd like to use it. Maybe it'd make more sense if you could explain that: what sort of polymorphism might you need, what public members do you need on Base, etc. –  Tim S. May 1 '13 at 15:01
    
Tim that would be a solution indeed... however with small problem - this won't compile either... generic argument must be present... bummer isn't it.. I would think this is a natural use for generics.. but apparently (according to SO gurus) this is magic... well... I have nothing to say. –  Boppity Bop May 1 '13 at 15:42
    
@BoppityBop D'oh! I forgot to make Base<T> : Base. It should compile now. –  Tim S. May 1 '13 at 16:46
    
sorry Tim. the solution you arrived at is a variation of the Interface problem in my Edit. User will not have access to the benefits of generic type T because it is shielded by Base... How am I going to use it? there is no way... it seems this has no solution. –  Boppity Bop May 2 '13 at 9:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.