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Say that in other programming language, I could declare int array[23][23] as a 2d array with 23 elements in each dimension.

How do I achieve the same thing by using Haxe ?

Currently I need to do this:

var arr : Array<Array<int>> = [[0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0]];

but when the array grows to larger size, it becomes infeasible for me to declare like that anymore.

Could anyone help me with this ?

share|improve this question

You can fake a 2D array by using a 1D array:

class Array2 extends Array 
{ 
    public var pitch(default, null): Int; 
    public function new(x: Int, y: Int) 
    { 
        pitch = x; 
        super(x * y); 
    } 

    public function get(x: Int, y: Int) 
    { 
        return this[y * pitch + x]; 
    } 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Wait, I'm totally new to Haxe, are you saying that there's no simple 2d array init in Haxe ? That's interesting – sub_o May 1 '13 at 11:58
    
Nope.. there really isn't. The way you show us in your OP is how it should be done, but there are many helper functions that can simplify it for you. (See Jason's answer) – John Willemse May 1 '13 at 13:53
    
Basic types cannot be extended in Haxe, this will not work. You need to give a parameter also anyway. – Cristi Băluță May 6 '13 at 7:08

As you figured in the comment on John's answer, there is no built-in for 2d arrays that I know of, but it's not hard to create one.

Here I've made 2 helper functions, one uses haxe.ds.Vector, which is new in Haxe 3 and is optimised for fixed size collections. The other uses normal arrays, so may be slower on some platforms, and technically isn't fixed width, just initialised to a certain size.

import haxe.ds.Vector;

class Vector2DTest
{
    static function main()
    {
        // 2D vector, fixed size, sometimes faster
        var v2d = Vector2D.create(3,5);

        v2d[0][0] = "Top Left";
        v2d[2][4] = "Bottom Right";

        trace (v2d);
        // [[Top Left,null,null,null,null],[null,null,null,null,null],[null,null,null,null,Bottom Right]]

        // 2D array, technically variable size, but you'll have to initialise them. Sometimes slower.
        var a2d = Array2D.create(3,5);

        a2d[0][0] = "Top Left";
        a2d[2][4] = "Bottom Right";

        trace (a2d);
        // [[Top Left,null,null,null,null],[null,null,null,null,null],[null,null,null,null,Bottom Right]]
    }
}

class Vector2D
{
    public static function create(w:Int, h:Int)
    {
        var v = new Vector(w);
        for (i in 0...w)
        {
            v[i] = new Vector(h);
        }
        return v;
    }
}
class Array2D
{
    public static function create(w:Int, h:Int)
    {
        var a = [];
        for (x in 0...w)
        {
            a[x] = [];
            for (y in 0...h)
            {
                a[x][y] = null;
            }
        }
        return a;
    }
}

The Vector2D will only work on Haxe 3 (released later this month), Array2D should work fine on Haxe 2 also.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @sri-harsha-chilakapati for the edit :) – Jason O'Neil Jul 1 '13 at 3:26

The best way to do this is to take advantage of array comprehensions, provided in Haxe 3:

var bigArray:Array<Array<Int>> = [for (x in 0...10) [for (y in 0...10) 0]];

Array comprehensions are a really nice and condensed syntax for making arrays. The above code would make a 10x10 array, filled with 0s. You can read more about them here.

If you're running Haxe 2 for some reason, the best way to do it would be to fill them out with for loops, as suggested previously.

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1  
I can do that in Haxe 2.07 also, but I had to do cast after the = – joeytwiddle Apr 3 '14 at 22:48
1  
Note: Contrarily to what's written in the above comment, it doesn't seem to work in Haxe pre-3.x. Though it compiles, the array merely is [false], which is not the intended behavior. – Avt'W Sep 6 '14 at 17:18

If you're not using haxe 3 and you want an array with nulls the shortest would be to init only the last element, the others will be filled with null:

var arr2d = new Array<Array<AType>>();
for (i in 0...10) { arr2d[i] = []; arr2d[i][10] = null; }

or like this to init with a value:

for (i in 0...10) for (j in 0...10) arr2d[i][j] = a_value;
share|improve this answer

this is a simple way to declare array in axe ( 3.0 )

 class Prova
 {
   static function main ( )
   {
     var arr : Array< Array<Int> > = [  [],[],[]   ] ;

     arr[0][0] = 10 ;
     arr[0][1] = 11 ;

     trace ( arr[0] );
     trace ( arr[1] ) ;
     trace ( arr[2] ) ;
     return 0 ;
   }
 }

output :

Prova.hx:12: [10,11]

Prova.hx:13: []

Prova.hx:14: []

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