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I'm trying use pipes to write a string using write() from inside the parent process.And then spawn a child process wherein i read it,count the number of words and write the word count back.Then have the parent process print the word count. I've come up with this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include<sys/wait.h>    
int main(void)
{
int  fd[2], nbytes,status,i,count=0;
pid_t   PID;
char    string[] = "Hello, world\n";
char    readbuffer[80];
pipe(fd);
close(fd[0]);
write(fd[1], string, (strlen(string)+1));

if((PID=fork())<0)
{
    printf("Error\n");
    _exit(0);
}
else if(PID==0)
{

    close(fd[1]);
    nbytes = read(fd[0], readbuffer, sizeof(readbuffer));
    for(i=0;readbuffer[i]!='\0';i++)
    {
        if(readbuffer[i]==' ')
        count++;
    }   
    //open(fd[1]);
    close(fd[0]);
    write(fd[1],&count,1);
    printf("The word count is %d ",count);
    //open(fd[0]);
}
else
{
    wait(&status);
    if(WIFEXITED(status))
{
    close(fd[1]);
    nbytes = read(fd[0], readbuffer, sizeof(readbuffer));
    printf("The word count is %d ",nbytes);
    //open(fd[1]);
}
else
{
    printf("Error\n");
    _exit(0);
}
}
return(0);
}

This compiles but i don't get any output. Can someone please help?

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Did you try using a pipe in one direction, before you attempted two? –  Beta May 1 '13 at 12:03
    
Yes that worked. –  Abhishek Herle May 1 '13 at 12:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I can't try the code but it looks like you are closing both the pipe ends in the child process. You use fd[1] to write but it is closed (before doing read).

I have no chance to compile and try this code so take it as an example and possibly fix problems. This example shows how to use two unidirectional pipes for sending data from the parent to the child process and from the child to the parent process.

int main(void)
{
        int     fd1[2], fd2[2], nbytes;
        pid_t   childpid;
        char    string[] = "Hello, world!\n";
        char    readbuffer[80];

        pipe(fd1);
        pipe(fd2);


        if((childpid = fork()) == -1)
        {
                perror("fork");
                exit(1);
        }

        if(childpid == 0)
        {
                /* Child process closes up input side of pipe fd1 */
                close(fd1[0]);
               /* Child process closes up output side of pipe fd2 */
                close(fd2[1]);

                /* Send "string" through the output side of pipe */
                write(fd1[1], string, (strlen(string)+1));
                /* Read in a string from the pipe */
                nbytes = read(fd2[0], readbuffer, sizeof(readbuffer));
                printf("Received string: %s", readbuffer);
                exit(0);
        }
        else
        {
                /* Parent process closes up output side of pipe fd1 */
                close(fd1[1]);
                /* Parent process closes up input side of pipe fd2 */
                close(fd2[0]);

                /* Read in a string from the pipe */
                nbytes = read(fd1[0], readbuffer, sizeof(readbuffer));
                printf("Received string: %s", readbuffer);
                /* Send "string" through the output side of pipe */
                write(fd2[1], string, (strlen(string)+1));
        }

        return(0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
anyway to resolve it? –  Abhishek Herle May 1 '13 at 12:41
1  
You are using a pipe to have a bidirectional communication. Usually pipe write and read ends are closed when you have a unidirectional communication. This is because one process is expected to write and the other to read. In this situation you have both processes writing and reading to/from the same pipe. The solution is to use two different unidirectional pipes one for communicating from parent to child and the other for communicating from child to parent. –  salvo May 1 '13 at 12:57

we must opened read end of a pipe,before we are going to write the data into pipe, otherwiese there is a signal called SIGPIPE occurs,
what the SIGPIPE does is, it is a synchronous signal which is received by a client process when it can no longer write to a pipe. the default ation that is performed by this signal is to terminate the process. this signal can oly be sent to the process associated with the socket but not to the process group of the socket.inorder to avoid abnormal termination the process needs to catch the signal and handle it.

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