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I'm building a code where I have to go trough alot of if/case functions. This on itself is not really a problem only that alot of these if's are the kinda the same.

In my code it has to go trough an if function, and if there is a match it wont matter what match it is it will have to go trough the same next if. But depending on both answers it will have to go to a different part of the code.

So for exmaple:

    Switch(A){

    case 1:
     Switch(B){
      case 1: do11thing();
      case 2: do12thing();
     }

    case 2:
     Switch(B){
      case 1: do21thing();
      case 2: do22thing();
     }

}

Does anyone know a solution instead of having to place the Switch(B) a lot of times within my code.

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1  
If you are asking for a C# solution, why not use valid C# syntax in your examples? What does If function 1 gives =2 mean? –  mbeckish May 1 '13 at 13:31
    
Removed C# tag. –  tnw May 1 '13 at 13:38
    
edited put valid c# sintaxes in –  user2339477 May 1 '13 at 13:40

3 Answers 3

you can use one if for the function returning value 2 , and then inside this if use all possibilities as different switch cases.It will be smoother and faster than multiple if loops.

for ex :-

if (2 == function1) {
switch(value of function 2)
{
case value_1:
..//do whatever u want;
break;
case value_2:
..//do whatever u want;
break;
default:
//do some error handling;
break;
}

}

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In case you have more jumps than executable code (the case that happens quite often when programming state machines), you may store your logic in some nested Dictionary, List and/or array object like the following:

// Maps A and B values to functionality
var funcs = new[] {
                      new[] { func00, func01, func02, ... },
                      new[] { func10, func11, func12, ... },
                      new[] { func20, func21, func22, ... },
                      ...
                  };

// Actually runs functionality according to your mapping
funcs[A][B](params);

So, in case of A=1 and B=2, the func12 will be called.

Of course, you may use lambdas (params) => {} as funcs in the structure.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this might work, I'm going to try this. Thank you. –  user2339477 May 1 '13 at 14:18
    
@user2339477 You're welcome. I'm using it in my own programs when I need similar kind of logic. –  Alexey May 1 '13 at 14:44
    
Would you know if this also works with arduino? I been trying it and it says that var does not name a type. –  user2339477 May 2 '13 at 8:40
    
@user2339477 It depends on the C# version you use. You might use Action<...> or Func<...> as type for inner array. If you'll be in a doubt, you could share an example of the array you have at the moment. –  Alexey May 2 '13 at 17:28

One thing you can do is combine cases. For example, say you have a string value that's your outer switch variable, and an int that's the inner switch variable. Your original code might be:

switch (theString)
{
    case "Foo":
        switch (theInt)
        {
            case 1: DoThing1(); break;
            case 2: DoThing2(); break;
            // many other cases
        }
        DoFooThing();
        break;
    case "Bar":
        switch (theInt)
        {
            case 1: DoThing1(); break;
            case 2: DoThing2(); break;
            // other cases, same as with "Foo"
        }
        DoBarThing();
        break;
}

You can combine the cases and have a conditional:

switch (theString)
{
    case "Foo":
    case "Bar":
        switch (theInt)
        {
            case 1: DoThing1(); break;
            case 2: DoThing2(); break;
            // many other cases
        }
        if (theString == "Foo")
            DoFooThing();
        else
            DoBarThing();
        break;
}

The type of logic you're describing, especially if there are very many cases, is probably best implemented using a lookup table. Doing so makes it much easier to follow the logic. It takes a bit more time to set up, but you can easily see in the table that you construct exactly what will happen with any combination of input values.

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although you got close to what I meant I think I wasnt clear enough in my version of my question. Sorry for that, I edited my question again –  user2339477 May 1 '13 at 14:11
    
@user2339477: In that case, you're better off with the table driven approach that I mentioned, and that Alexey demonstrated. –  Jim Mischel May 1 '13 at 14:51

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